ever.' name='description'> e'er - definition and meaning

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adverb Contraction of ever.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • A contraction of ever.
  • A suffix of nouns of agent, being a more English spelling of -ier, equivalent to the older -er, as in prisoner, etc. (see -er), as in engineer (formerly enginer), pamphleteer, gazetteer, buccaneer, cannoneer, etc., and, with reference to place of residence, mountaineer, garreteer, etc.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adverb A contraction for ever. See ever.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adverb poetic Contraction of ever.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adverb at all times; all the time and on every occasion

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Wow betide you Molly Whoppie, if you e'er return again!

    NZ/Aus Author Series: Yvonne Lindsay

  • For, says he, do you mind me, let storms e'er so oft

    Letter 94

  • Look for the silver lining when e'er a cloud appears in the blue.

    A Star Named Marilyn (But Not The One You Think)

  • Walcott is a Nobel Prize winner who, to paraphrase Wordsworth, leaves trailing clouds of sexual harassment behind him where e'er he goes, at least in the 617 area code.

    When Will the Poetic Violence End?

  • There'll be steam coming off the Bernina e'er long.

    47 entries from February 2008

  • (Soundbite of song, "Look for the Silver Lining") Ms. MARILYN MILLER (Musical-comedy star): (Singing) Look for the silver lining when e'er a cloud appears in the blue.

    A Star Named Marilyn (But Not The One You Think)

  • (Soundbite of song, "Look for the Silver Lining") Ms. MARILYN MILLER (Musical-comedy star): (Singing) Look for the silver lining when e'er a cloud appears in the blue.

    A Star Named Marilyn (But Not The One You Think)

  • Also at the CAC, ubiquitous HuffPost big man on campus Harry Shearer, an honorary native New Orleanian if e'er there were one, has installed a nine-monitor presentation, called The Silent Echo Chamber (thru June 6), of his ongoing "found objects" captures - political and media figures seen not on the air, but just before, as they prepare themselves for broadcast.

    Peter Frank: Blague d'Art: Apres le Deluge, Moi

  • Look for the silver lining when e'er a cloud appears in the blue.

    A Star Named Marilyn (But Not The One You Think)

  • Also at the CAC, ubiquitous HuffPost big man on campus Harry Shearer, an honorary native New Orleanian if e'er there were one, has installed a nine-monitor presentation, called The Silent Echo Chamber (thru June 6), of his ongoing "found objects" captures - political and media figures seen not on the air, but just before, as they prepare themselves for broadcast.

    Blague d'Art: Apres le Deluge, Moi

Comments

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  • The "poetic" version of ever.

    I think this was done to reduce the amount of syllables for iambic pentameter. Byron's such a big fat cheater!

    May 17, 2009

  • Byron and, y know, English poetry since the 16th century

    May 17, 2009

  • I just happened to be reading Byron at the moment which was littered with all these weird contractions and realized this was the reason we have so many in our language and also why I hate Shakespeare. It seems like a cop out. What is the motivation for even using iambic pentameter?

    The v seems like it would be a key component. Why not have it be ev'?

    May 17, 2009

  • Poetry was a big thing in the old days, and poets were allowed to work with a language which was consciously unquotidian. It doesn't wash today (and rightly so) because what we expect of poetry has changed; now it has to humble itself in the demotic or be guillotined (notwithstanding that 99.9% of people ignore it).

    May 17, 2009

  • I was thinking that it might make it easier to read giving it some sort of rhythmic pace. But to make the rules so complex that they were forced to circumvent them by making square pegs fit in the round holes seems lame. Maybe they thought it made it even harder to understand enabling them to pretty much say whatever they wanted? Or maybe I just expect too much from them given all their hype.

    May 17, 2009

  • Contractions like e'er and o'er, as well as spellings like the monosyllabic heav'n and giv'n should not be taken as indications of poets "cheating" or trying to fit square pegs into round holes. For one thing, poets like Byron knew exactly what they were doing when it came to prosody; they dreamed in iambic pentameter in a way few of us can imagine.

    As such they were very familiar with the concept of the reduced syllable – a nearly ellided syllable that should not be given the weight even of the unstressed beat in the iambic foot. Often two syllables could be counted as one; this could be indicated with a contraction such as e'er or even (e'en) to th'. The fact that the v sound is involved in a number of these contractions may also tell us that this sound had various qualities to it and could be pronounced differently in different contexts or by different speakers; historically, after all, the letter v represented both a consonant and a vowel (u).

    Today many poets no longer count syllables the way they used to (and many still do but don't want us to think they do).

    Sadly, I'm not sure people expect anything of poetry these days, or rather, if they do, they expect it to be sentimental or inspiring and so don't really "get" what contemporary poets are writing (as with modern art, they think, "jeez, I could have written that! It doesn't even rhyme!"). Probably a lot of people would love it if more poets were more "poetic".

    Myth, don't give up on Shakespeare, Byron, or anyone else just because they don't write as if they were born in 1970. Try to learn their language first (and don't assume it has to be the same as yours), before you judge them. They still have a lot of amazing things to tell us, even though (or perhaps because) they are centuries away from us.

    May 17, 2009

  • poetic meter isn't a complex set of rules. it's one rule: put this many syllables in each line.

    the complexity comes from the syllabic flexibility of words, found in normal human speech as often as in poetry. does it also irritate you that some people say, for example, "fire", as one syllable instead of two?

    May 18, 2009

  • @madmouth: Do they spell it f're or fi'e and do it to force their sentences into iambic meter? If so, then yes. :) If the rules are so simple, why do they need to massacre the words? :)

    @rolig: The style doesn't prevent me from enjoying the other parts of the poetry. I just thought it was funny that the manipulation was so blatant without seeming to sound or appear any better for it. I'm more a fan of 1800-1900's style of writing. I just picked up Byron because Shaw, Chesterton and Fitzgerald seem to keep mentioning him and I was curious. I might not have stumbled upon his good stuff yet or just expect him to be more "poetic" with flowery words.

    May 18, 2009

  • l're, l're--pants f're

    sounds good to me.

    May 18, 2009

  • The "rules" of meter may be clearcut enough, but the variations in how poets follow them, or choose to break them, to create the effects they want, are countless and fascinating.

    Byron was brilliant in being able to use plain, chatty English, often with great comic effect, as in Don Juan (the name should be pronounced to rhyme with "Ewan"), but he could also write lovely "poetic" poetry, as in "She walks in beauty like the night".

    You sound a bit like an old fogey, myth, who complains that poets (i.e. rappers) these days are "massacring" words because they write "gonna" and "witya" instead of "going to" and "with you".

    May 18, 2009