Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of elegy.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And we, apparently, mourn our parents in elegies to a much greater extent than do others in the U.S. and U.K., for example, who tend to mark the death of youth more frequently with this poetic form.

    2009 March 10 | NIGEL BEALE NOTA BENE BOOKS

  • And we, apparently, mourn our parents in elegies to a much greater extent than do others in the U.S. and U.K., for example, who tend to mark the death of youth more frequently with this poetic form.

    Audio Interview with Priscila Uppal by Nigel Beale: On Canadian Elegies, and mourning

  • The general theme of the elegies is the sorrow and desolation created by the destruction of Jerusalem [2] in 586 B.C.: the last poem (v.) is a prayer for deliverance from the long continued distress.

    Introduction to the Old Testament

  • One of the earliest of the elegies was a sonnet by William Basse, who gave picturesque expression to the conviction that Shakespeare would enjoy for all time an unique reverence on the part of his countrymen.

    Shakespeare and the Modern Stage with Other Essays

  • 'Love has no wherefore,' says one of those Latin poets who wrote love-verses called elegies, -- a name which we moderns appropriate to funeral dirges.

    Kenelm Chillingly — Complete

  • 'Love has no wherefore,' says one of those Latin poets who wrote love-verses called elegies, -- a name which we moderns appropriate to funeral dirges.

    Kenelm Chillingly — Volume 03

  • Also in the Stranger: Annie Wagner on The Namesake, "a perfectly subtle story that stiffens with each new visual gimmick," and Michael Atkinson on a sampling of video "elegies" by Alexander Sokurov, "one of the modern age's most restless and uncompromised cinematic powerhouses."

    GreenCine Daily: Shorts, 3/19.

  • Goethe cultivated a special, italianate hand for this portfolio of twenty-four "elegies," so called because he was emulating the elegiasts of

    Erotica Romana

  • If the sonnets, odes, and elegies are primarily concerned with "memory, private reclamation, and linguistic chop-chop," as Biespiel has it, why would a public yearning for "moral persuasion" bother with it?

    Poetry

  • If the sonnets, odes, and elegies are primarily concerned with "memory, private reclamation, and linguistic chop-chop," as Biespiel has it, why would a public yearning for "moral persuasion" bother with it?

    May 2010

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  • "Patrick Furnan left his pew and strode to the lectern. He didn't do a good stride; he was too stout for that. But his speech was certainly a change from the elegies the two previous men had given."-Dead as a Doornail, by Charlaine Harris

    May 19, 2011