Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adv. able to be eliminated.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Capable of being eliminated.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Weakening is made an eliminable rule by letting initial sequents have the form

    Chores

  • (For example, the sentence “Rama and Sita are righteous” is equivalent to “Rama is righteous and Sita is righteous”, but the term-connective in “Rama and Sita are married” is not similarly eliminable in favour of the truth-functional conjunction “Rama is married and Sita is married”.)

    Analytic Philosophy in Early Modern India

  • At first Berkeley poured scorn on those who adhere to the concept of infinitesimal. maintaining that the use of infinitesimals in deriving mathematical results is illusory, and is in fact eliminable.

    Continuity and Infinitesimals

  • For this reason, Zimmerman concedes that “the role that luck plays in the determination of moral responsibility may not be entirely eliminable ¦” (2002, 575).

    Moral Luck

  • (PR §168), it is an eliminable pseudo-proposition standing proxy for the proved inductive base and inductive step.

    Wittgenstein's Philosophy of Mathematics

  • Budd suggests that the metaphor is reducible, and thus eliminable, apparently in terms of purely musical (i.e., non-spatial) concepts or vocabulary.

    The Philosophy of Music

  • It merely holds that when truth occurs in the outermost position in a sentence, and the full sentence to which truth is predicated is quoted, then truth is eliminable.

    Truth

  • But because dominations is never wholly eliminable, defensible politics is inherently fragile.

    Paul Ricoeur

  • Those who hold teleology in biology to be metaphorical in nature typically regard it as eliminable; i.e., they believe that the science of biology would not be essentially altered if all references to teleology were eschewed.

    Teleological Notions in Biology

  • In Max Weber's great essay, "Politics as a Vocation," there is vividly expressed a standpoint opposed to the old view of the State as essentially "natural," with the violence and coercion which it in fact practices being in principle eliminable.

    A Special Supplement: On Violence

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