Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • transitive verb To remove or carry away to a distance, especially so as to conceal.
  • transitive verb To take (oneself) to a distance.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • etc. See eloin, etc.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb obsolete To remove afar off; to withdraw.
  • transitive verb (Law) To convey to a distance, or beyond the jurisdiction, or to conceal, as goods liable to distress.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb obsolete, transitive To remove (something) to a distance.
  • verb reflexive To remove (oneself); to retire, move away (from).

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English elongen, from Old French esloigner, from Late Latin ēlongāre : Latin ē-, ex-, ex- + Latin longus, long, distant; see del- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Anglo-Norman esloignier, Old French esloignier, from Late Latin exlongare.

Examples

  • I mean we have got people here on staff here at CNN, they are all over the city who race to get their 3-year-old to the best preschool which cost $20,000 a year so they can immediately start translating from the eloign (ph) from Greek to Chinese.

    CNN Transcript May 15, 2005

  • Those States have assume the right ofdeciding upon the propriety of our domestic institutions; and have denied the rights of property established in fifteenof the States and recognized by the Constitution; they have denounced as sinful the institution of slavery; they havepermitted open establishment among them of societies, whose avowed object is to disturb the peace and to eloign theproperty of the citizens of other States.

    DISUNION!

  • Those States have assume the right of deciding upon the propriety of our domestic institutions; and have denied the rights of property established in fifteen of the States and recognized by the Constitution; they have denounced as sinful the institution of slavery; they have permitted open establishment among them of societies, whose avowed object is to disturb the peace and to eloign the property of the citizens of other States.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Was the Declaration of Independence an Example of Secession, Revolution, or Both?

  • And this is the true exposition of the rule that the artist must first eloign himself from nature in order to return to her with full effect.

    On Poesy or Art

  • And this is the true exposition of the rule that the artist must first eloign himself from nature in order to return to her with full effect.

    Literary Remains, Volume 1

  • Those States have assumed the right of deciding upon the propriety of our domestic institutions; and have denied the rights of property established in fifteen of the States and recognized by the Constitution: they have denounced as sinful the institution of slavery; they have permitted open establishment among them of societies, whose avowed object is to disturb the peace and to eloign the property of the citizens of other States.

    Boing Boing

Comments

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  • "Those states ... have permitted the open establishment among them of societies, whose avowed object is to disturb the peace and to eloign the property of the citizens of other States."

    --Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina, December 24, 1860

    March 12, 2008