Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • An obsolete form of imprison.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb See imprison.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Obsolete form of imprison.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And the best of all is this: we don't have to exploit anyone to do this, we don't have to kill anyone, we don't have to lie, betray or emprison anyone.

    Protest the G20 protesters here

  • His desire for the crown and and chains he had meant to emprison her in, that was it.

    Conan The Triumphant

  • When you see the judge on his bench, you see through him, as clearly as if he were made of glass, the policeman to emprison, and the soldier to slay some actual living person.

    News from Nowhere, or, an Epoch of Rest : being some chapters from a utopian romance

  • "If we go to Iskandrian with this tale," Conan said finally, "he will think it a ruse of the nobles and slay us, or emprison us for madmen until it is too late.

    Conan The Triumphant

  • When you see the judge on his bench, you see through him, as clearly as if he were made of glass, the policeman to emprison and the soldier to slay some actual living person. such follies would make an agreeable market, wouldn't they? "

    News from Nowhere

  • When you see the judge on his bench, you see through him, as clearly as if he were made of glass, the policeman to emprison and the soldier to slay some actual living person. such follies would make an agreeable market, wouldn't they? "

    News From Nowhere, or, An Epoch of Rest [a machine-readable transcription]

Comments

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  • Or if thy mistress some rich anger shows,

    Emprison her soft hand, and let her rave,

    And feed deep, deep upon her peerless eyes.

    —Keats, 'Ode on Melancholy'

    July 15, 2008