Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • On February 27th 2009, eris wrote: he´s so ridiculus, an animal like him must to be judged and go right to jail.

    Chris Brown & Rihanna Moving In Together

  • In my last post about a third party, d. eris 'blog and the post he pointed me to (whose numeric analysis of the recent election is very interesting), we're all talking about a 3rd party in American politics.

    8 posts from July 2009

  • There's a lot of theoretical argument against it, d. eris (here and on his blog) and Dale Shelton have both mentioned Duverger's Law, and the nature of the American politic which impedes a multi-party system.

    8 posts from July 2009

  • Heraclitus calls the oppositional processes eris, "strife", and hypothesizes that the apparently stable state, dikē, or "justice," is a harmony of it: "We must know that war polemos is common to all and strife is justice, and that all things come into being through strife necessarily."

    "So lower your expectations, and enjoy the Rourke."

  • His duos attracted the attention of later musicians; three movements from his Missa ‘Quem dicunt homines’, two from his Magnificat secundi toni and the ‘Pleni’ of the Missa super ‘Si dedero’ (the last with the contrafact text Semper eris pauper) were printed in didactic collections of two-voice pieces such as Il primo libro a due voci (Venice, 1543) and Diphona amoena et florida (Nuremberg, 1549).

    Archive 2009-05-01

  • And how does being brought up a muslim equate with "radical islam"? eris

    On Thursday, the Legg report will be published along with...

  • ''ERISTIC: i ris/ tik adj Gr. eristikos, d. erizein, to strive, dispute d. eris, strife of or provoking controversy, or given to sophistical argument and specious reasoning.''

    "I Am Lapidary But Not Eristic When I Use Big Words."

  • The Prettiest Cat EV-eris funny, lively, lovable, very affectionate and sociable with any person.

    This is Not a Cat Blog « XUP

  • This family bears: party per pale or and sable, an orle counterchanged and two lozenges counterchanged, with: “i, semper melius eris,” — a motto which, together with the two distaffs taken as supporters, proves the modesty of the burgher families in the days when the Orders held their allotted places in the State; and the naivete of our ancient customs by the pun on

    A Start in Life

  • Augustus, by Livia, and all the palace, at hearing this half line alone: “Tu Marcellus eris.” —

    A Philosophical Dictionary

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