Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb Botany To cause (a plant) to develop without chlorophyll by preventing exposure to sunlight.
  • intransitive verb To cause to appear pale and sickly.
  • intransitive verb To make weak by stunting the growth or development of.
  • intransitive verb To become blanched or whitened, as when grown without sunlight.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To grow white from absence of the normal amount of coloring matter, as the leaves or stalks of plants; be whitened by exclusion of the light of the sun, as plants: sometimes, in pathology, said of persons.
  • To blanch; whiten by exclusion of the sun's rays or by disease.
  • Synonyms Blanch, etc. See whiten.
  • Also etiolize.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Having a blanched or faded appearance, as birds inhabiting desert regions.
  • intransitive verb To become white or whiter; to be whitened or blanched by excluding the light of the sun, as, plants.
  • intransitive verb (Med.) To become pale through disease or absence of light.
  • transitive verb To blanch; to bleach; to whiten by depriving of the sun's rays.
  • transitive verb (Med.) To cause to grow pale by disease or absence of light.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To make pale through lack of light, especially of a plant.
  • verb To make a person pale and sickly-looking.
  • adjective etiolated

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb bleach and alter the natural development of (a green plant) by excluding sunlight
  • adjective (especially of plants) developed without chlorophyll by being deprived of light
  • verb make weak by stunting the growth or development of
  • verb make pale or sickly

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[French étioler, from Norman French étieuler, to grow into haulm, from éteule, stalk, from Old French esteule, from Vulgar Latin *stupula, from Latin stipula.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

French étioler, from Norman French étieuler, ultimately from Old French estuble ("stubble"), from Latin stupla, from stipula ("straw, stubble") (English stubble).

Examples

Comments

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  • "Already, on the walk from the station, the May sunshine had made him feel dirty and etiolated, a creature of indoors, with the sooty dust of London in the pores of his skin." George Orwell, 1984

    February 6, 2011