Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A single-celled or multicellular organism whose cells contain a distinct membrane-bound nucleus.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of the single-celled or multicellular organisms, of the taxonomic domain Eukaryota, whose cells contain at least one distinct nucleus.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. an organism with "good" or membrane-bound nuclei having multiple chromosomes; eucaryotes also have other membrane-bound organelles such as mitochondria or chloroplasts, within the cytoplasm enclosed by the outer membrane. Such cells are characteristic of all life forms except primitive microorganisms such as bacteria and blue-green algae. Contrasted with prokaryote.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an organism with cells characteristic of all life forms except primitive microorganisms such as bacteria; i.e. an organism with `good' or membrane-bound nuclei in its cells

Etymologies

eu- + Greek karuōtos, having nuts (from karuon, nut; see kar- in Indo-European roots).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
eu- +‎ kary- + -ote (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • ‡ The word eukaryote comes from the Greek for “true nucleus.

    eukaryote

  • Am I not right when I say that the simplest eukaryote is a heck of a lot more complex than the archaea is?

    Another Big Example of Reductive Evolution?

  • His theory follows years of analysis of the Archaea and a comparison with bacterial and eukaryote cell lines.

    A Disclaimer for Behe?

  • Paul Nelson: Then, for any extant eukaryote, there exists, not one, but n possible cellular ancestors at the Darwinian threshold (when Eukarya first evolved).

    A Disclaimer for Behe?

  • Given that these lines of ancestry do not converge to a point, but pass through an interval of indeterminate width into a communal state, the set of ancestors of any eukaryote will not include a universally shared organismal member (usually referred to the literature as the last eukaryotic common ancestor, LECA).

    A Disclaimer for Behe?

  • Then, for any extant eukaryote, there exists, not one, but n possible cellular ancestors at the Darwinian threshold (when Eukarya first evolved).

    A Disclaimer for Behe?

  • Guts: All the pieces needed for tyrosine kinase signaling came together in a single celled eukaryote.

    Biomolecular Networks

  • All the pieces needed for tyrosine kinase signaling came together in a single celled eukaryote.

    Biomolecular Networks

  • Having been the "start" amino acid in prokaryotes, it would therefore retain this position among their eukaryote descendants, at least for a while (assuming that one believes, like Michael Behe does, in evolutionary homology).

    Always finish what you start…

  • Allen MacNeill: Having been the "start" amino acid in prokaryotes, it would therefore retain this position among their eukaryote descendants, at least for a while

    Always finish what you start…

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