Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state of being exacting.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The quality of being exacting, in either sense.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • She set her clean canvas firmly upon the easel, as a barrier, frail, but she hoped sufficiently substantial to ward off Mr Ramsay and his exactingness.

    To the Lighthouse

  • Not for them exactingness, caprice, the gay or grave analysis of love and lover: such moods charm alone in lovely women, and even in _them_ bring risks along.

    Browning's Heroines

  • The cruel exactingness of Emperor Wu's laws was also modeled upon Ch'in Legalist practices.

    The History of the Former Han Dynasty

  • The exactingness of the desire for public spectacles increased, even in secondary cities.

    Characters and events of Roman History

  • Alas, this deep insatiableness of sense, the dreary vacuity of soul that follows fulness of animal delight, the restless exactingness of undirected imagination, was never recognised by Rousseau distinctly enough to modify either his conduct or his theory of life.

    Rousseau

  • It is not so much exactingness on my part, as that you spoke of meaning to write as soon as you received a note of mine ... which went to you five minutes afterwards ... which is three days ago, or will be when you read this.

    The Letters of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Barrett

  • But on the other hand, it must be remembered that her standard of exactingness was 'high, and some of the things that in her eyes it was merely culpable to leave undone might be counted by others among virtues of supererogation.

    George Eliot; a Critical Study of Her Life, Writings & Philosophy

  • But on the other hand, it must be remembered that her standard of exactingness was

    George Eliot; A Critical Study of Her Life, Writings and Philosophy

  • This point deserves attention, not for the sake of the miserable and ruinous advantage which is obtained by taunting an adversary in controversy with inconsistency till you drive him to improve his logical position by increasing the exactingness of his demands, but because the advocates of Home Rule (honestly enough, no doubt) confuse the matter under discussion by a strange kind of intellectual shuffle.

    England's Case Against Home Rule

  • She was oppressed by ennui, and by that dissatisfaction which in women's minds is continually turning into a trivial jealousy, referring to no real claims, springing from no deeper passion than the vague exactingness of egoism, and yet capable of impelling action as well as speech.

    Middlemarch

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