Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To extirpate.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To extirpate.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To extirpate; root out; eradicate; expel.
  • To speak abusively; rail.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Compare French extirper.

Examples

  • Yes, in good sooth, the vice is of a great kindred; it is well allied; but it is impossible to extirp it quite, friar, till eating and drinking be put down.

    Act III. Scene II. Measure for Measure

  • Yes, in good sooth, the vice is of a great kindred; it is well allied: but it is impossible to extirp it quite, friar, till eating and drinking be put down.

    Measure for Measure

  • _ Yes, in good sooth, the vice is of a great kindred; 95 it is well allied: but it is impossible to extirp it quite, friar, till eating and drinking be put down.

    Measure for Measure The Works of William Shakespeare [Cambridge Edition] [9 vols.]

  • Parliament; its object was to enable the King as Supreme Head to effect the "increase of virtue in Christ's Religion within this Realm of England, and to repress and extirp all Errors, Heresies and other

    Henry VIII.

Comments

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  • Nowadays, extirpate.

    November 24, 2010