Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A bow strung with horse-hair with which the strings of the violin or a similar instrument are set in vibration. Also fiddlestick. See cut under violin.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • β€œIt shall fly to a better fiddle-bow presently, sir, an I have the luck —”

    Westward Ho!

  • If they bring thee back safe, they may chance to sing to the twiggen fiddle-bow, that they may be warned from such folly; but if they come back without thee, by All-hallows the wind of wrath shall sweep their heads off them!

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • He was sitting with her in the drawing-room, with his arm round her waist, saying every now and then some little soft words of affection and working hard with his imaginary fiddle-bow, when Mr. Arabin entered the room.

    Barchester Towers

  • Thou wouldst have said he is tearing up the vital artery with his fiddle-bow.

    The Gulistan of Sa'di

  • The fiddle-bow was drawn across the tuning-fork, and the fork applied with its thrilling note to the conducting wire which Lefevre held.

    Master of His Fate

  • She opened her eyes and smiled at sight of the fiddle-bow and tuning-fork.

    Master of His Fate

  • When he returned with the fiddle-bow and the tuning-fork, he saw Lefevre had placed the machine ready, with fresh chemicals in the vessels.

    Master of His Fate

  • If he has never painted Nero performing that celebrated violin-solo over Rome, it is because he despaired of conveying an idea of the tremulous flourish of the fiddle-bow.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 1, July, 1862

  • As she ended, he snapped his jaws together, and tore away the fettered member, curling it under him with a snarl, -- when she burst into the gayest reel that ever answered a fiddle-bow.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 05, No. 31, May, 1860

  • Street, would be mobbed, if they paraded such vestments at their doors; and Papanti would break his fiddle-bow over the head of any awkward lout who should unfortunately assume such an ungainly position.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 100, February, 1866

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