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Examples

  • This phrase derives its origin from the custom of certain manors where tenants are authorized to take fire-bote by hook or by crook; that is, so much of the underwood as may be cut with a crook, and so much of the loose timber as may be collected from the boughs by means of a hook.

    Quotations

  • This phrase derives its origin from the custom of certain manors where tenants are authorized to take fire-bote by hook or by crook; that is, so much of the underwood as may be cut with a crook, and so much of the loose timber as may be collected from the boughs by means of a hook.

    Quotations

  • This phrase derives its origin from the custom of certain manors where tenants are authorized to take fire-bote by hook or by crook; that is, so much of the underwood as may be cut with a crook, and so much of the loose timber as may be collected from the boughs by means of a hook.

    Quotations

  • Despair fell cold upon Nigel's heart and blanched the face of the old dame as they listened to the dread catalogue of claims and suits and issues, questions of peccary and turbary, of house-bote and fire-bote, which ended by a demand for all the lands, hereditaments, tenements, messuages and curtilages, which made up their worldly all.

    Sir Nigel

  • Nigel's heart and blanched the face of the old dame as they listened to the dread catalogue of claims and suits and issues, questions of peccary and turbary, of house-bote and fire-bote, which ended by a demand for all the lands, hereditaments, tenements, messuages and curtilages, which made up their worldly all.

    Sir Nigel

  • [15-9] This phrase derives its origin from the custom of certain manors where tenants are authorized to take fire-bote _by hook or by crook_; that is, so much of the underwood as many be cut with a crook, and so much of the loose timber as may be collected from the boughs by means of a hook.

    Familiar Quotations A Collection of Passages, Phrases, and Proverbs Traced to Their Sources in Ancient and Modern Literature

  • Hence the transition from serfdom and socage service to free labor, from domestic-servant labor to day-labor and piece-work, from feudal military service to that of paid and standing armies, from land-privileges and allowances in produce, such as fire-bote etc., to the payment of officials in money, from dues in produce to taxes in money, and regular lease-hold interests, from requisitions to loans of money; in a word, from the barter-economy

    System der volkswirthschaft. English

  • The having the wood assigned for fire-bote and hay-bote is not necessary, 4 Inst. 300.

    Reports of cases argued and determined in the Court of exchequer, from Easter term 32 George III. to [Trinity term 37 George III.] ... both inclusive. [1792-1797]

  • [We insert the above, as one of the many explanations which have been given of this very popular phrase -- although we believe the correct origin to be the right of taking _fire-bote by hook or by crook_.

    Notes and Queries, Number 68, February 15, 1851 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc.

  • -- _We believe the real origin of the phrase_ By hook or by crook _to be the "right of taking_ fire-bote by hook or by crook," _as explained in_ "N. & Q.,

    Notes and Queries, Number 208, October 22, 1853 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc

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