Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • The flint-head and a portion of the shaft were stained with blood.

    The Last Trail

  • The flint-head lacerating his flesh and scraping his shoulder bones caused sharpest agony.

    The Last Trail

  • A meeting such as this impending must be a matter only of close personal encounter and fencing with arm and wooden handle and flint-head of edge and weight.

    The Story of Ab A Tale of the Time of the Cave Man

  • Mr. Bilkins tried to conjecture who was meant by old flint-head, but was obliged to give it up.

    A Rivermouth Romance

  • At Margaret's request, and in Margaret's name, Mr. Bilkins wrote three or four letters to O'Rourke, and finally succeeded in extorting an epistle from that gentleman, in which he told Margaret to cheer up, that his fortune was as good as made, and that the day would come when she should ride through the town in her own coach, and no thanks to old flint-head, who pretended to be so fond of her.

    A Rivermouth Romance

  • Then the wedges were removed, and when the handle was bound all round the split part with cord, and the flint-head enveloped in the same, the whole thing became like a solid mass.

    The Island Queen

  • This of itself caused the wood to hold the flint-head very firmly.

    The Island Queen

  • "I am no scholar, and I care not who knows it; but, judging from what I have seen, at deer chases and squirrel hunts, of the sparks below, I should think a rifle in the hands of their grandfathers was not so dangerous as a hickory bow and a good flint-head might be, if drawn with Indian judgment, and sent by an Indian eye".

    The Last of the Mohicans

  • I should think a rifle in the hands of their grandfathers was not so dangerous as a hickory bow and a good flint-head might be, if drawn with

    The Last of the Mohicans; A narrative of 1757

  • For a moment he appeared to be conscious of having the worst of the argument, then, rallying again, he answered the objection of his antagonist in the best manner his limited information would allow: "I am no scholar, and I care not who knows it; but judging from what I have seen, at deer chases and squirrel hunts, of the sparks below, I should think a rifle in the hands of their grandfathers was not so dangerous as a hickory bow and a good flint-head might be, if drawn with Indian judgment, and sent by an Indian eye."

    The Last of the Mohicans A Narrative of 1757

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  • (n): common name for the wood stork, (wood ibis).

    January 12, 2009