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Examples

  • The flunkeyism, which is a characteristic of all the Germanic races, was peculiarly marked in England from the earliest times, and induced men, even in those “spacious days,” not only to overpraise fair hair, but to run down dark hair and eyes as ugly.

    The Man Shakespeare

  • The flunkeyism, which is a characteristic of all the Germanic races, was peculiarly marked in England from the earliest times, and induced men, even in those "spacious days," not only to overpraise fair hair, but to run down dark hair and eyes as ugly.

    The Man Shakespeare

  • Second, North Korea patterned its entire philosophy of self-sufficiency - juche - as a repudiation of what it termed the "flunkeyism" of Korea's previous position in the Chinese tributary system.

    North Korea as future ally of US?

  • South Korea's policy harkens back to that Old Korea adopted toward Qing China called Sadaejuŭi 事大主義, translasted as "worship of the powerful," "flunkeyism," or "toadyism."

    China, Mongolia, Korea

  • Robert, who has had glimpses of him, says the 'flunkeyism' is quite humiliating.

    The Letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning

  • This dependency is enshrined in the word sadaejuui, or flunkeyism, which defined the tributary relationship that once bound Korea to China and which serves today as the antonym to juche, or self-reliance, the nominal philosophy that governs North Korea.

    John Feffer: Obama: Engage North Korea Now (But Don't Tell Anyone)

  • Yet I have never seen a community so competitive, so full of snobbery and flunkeyism, a ruling class so selfish and so class-conscious, or a proletariat so fawning, so lacking in all solidarity and sense of corporate honour.

    Surprised by Joy

  • The real difference is not between the forms of government, but between the innate flunkeyism of the Briton and the independence of the American.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 2, August, 1862 Devoted to Literature and National Policy

  • If it be objected to this, that it is an admission of the power which is claimed for flunkeyism, we can only meet the charge by saying that there is much of the flunkey in man, and that whoso shall endeavor to construct a government without recognizing a truth which is universal, though not great, will find that his structure can better be compared to the Syrian flower than to the Syrian cedar.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 05, No. 28, February, 1860

  • We have come to serious and terrible days, and must be free from all such flunkeyism.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 1, July, 1862

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