Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A walking pace.
  • n. A raised platform in a room, as for a lecturer; a dais.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A walking pace or step.
  • n. A dais, or elevated platform; the highest step of the altar; a landing in a staircase.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A walking pace or step.
  • n. A dais, or elevated platform; the highest step of the altar; a landing in a staircase.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A slow step, as in walking.
  • n. A mat; something on which to place the feet.
  • n. A landing or resting-place at the end of a short flight of steps, being a stair or tread broader than the others. Also called half-pace. When it occurs at the angle where the stair turns it is called quarter-pace.
  • n. Formerly, the dais in a hall. See the extract.
  • n. Eccles., the platform or raised dais upon which an altar immediately stands.
  • n. A hearthstone.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Atra, who came and stood humbly on the footpace beside her, and held converse with her mistress a while.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • It was a cross – country road, full, after the first three or four miles, of holes and cart – ruts, which, being covered by the snow, were so many pitfalls to the trembling horses, and obliged them to keep a footpace.

    The Old Curiosity Shop

  • We found the coach very near at hand, and got upon the roof; but I was so dead sleepy, that when we stopped on the road to take up somebody else, they put me inside where there were no passengers, and where I slept profoundly, until I found the coach going at a footpace up a steep hill among green leaves.

    David Copperfield

  • Lord George Gordon; ‘we will follow at a footpace.’

    Barnaby Rudge

  • Rostov reined in his horse, whose spirits had risen, like his own, at the firing, and went back at a footpace.

    War and Peace

  • Rostov rode on at a footpace not knowing why or to whom he was now going.

    War and Peace

  • Dolokhov was a long time mounting his horse which would not stand still, then he rode out of the yard at a footpace.

    War and Peace

  • The huntsman stood halfway up the knoll holding up his whip and the gentlefolk rode up to him at a footpace; the hounds that were far off on the horizon turned away from the hare, and the whips, but not the gentlefolk, also moved away.

    War and Peace

  • They rode at a footpace to the barn, where a large crowd of peasants was standing.

    War and Peace

  • Nicholas sent the man to call Natasha and Petya to him, and rode at a footpace to the place where the whips were getting the hounds together.

    War and Peace

Comments

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  • In armour before the earthen footpace he stood;
    —Charles Williams, 'Taliessin at Lancelot's Mass', in Taliessin Through Logres

    each at the earthen footpace ordained to be blessed and to bless
    ib.

    March 22, 2009