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Examples

  • Neque enim tam actio, aut recordatio rerum hujusmodi displicet, sed iis vel gestus alterius Imaginationi adumbrare, vehementer molestum.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Turpium deliciarum comes est externa saltatio; neque certe facile dictu quae mala hinc visus hauriat, et quae pariat, colloquia, monstrosus, inconditos gestus, &c.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Fingebam honestatem plusquam virginis vestalis, intuebar oculis uxoris, addebam gestus, &c.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Vestiti more metallicorum, gestus et opera eorum imitantur.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Non tam (inquit Hippocrates) gibbos et cicatrices oris et corporis habitum agnoscis ex iis, sed verum incessum gestus, mores, morbos, &c.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Elegantissima res est, quae et mentem acuit, corpus exerceat, et spectantes oblectet, multos gestus decoros docens, oculos, aures, animum ex aeque demulcens.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Nam sicuti cum adnuimus et abnuimus, motus quidem ille vel capitis vel oculorum a natura rei quam significabat non abhorret; ita in his vocibus, quasi gestus quidam oris et spiritus naturalis est.

    The Roman Pronunciation of Latin Why we use it and how to use it

  • Wageningen and Warnecke, in the works cited above, we arrive at little but that the gestures natural to any Italian-born person in a like situation are reproduced, such as "gestus abeuntis, cogitantis, parasiti," etc. It is almost too much to make any of this a basis for argument as to classical and pre-classical stage-craft.

    The Dramatic Values in Plautus

  • The Latin inscription is nearly effaced, but the beginning is still visible, and runs thus: "Caput ecce manus gestus que;" from which Oelrichs concludes that the whole was written in hexameters.

    Sidonia, the Sorceress : the Supposed Destroyer of the Whole Reigning Ducal House of Pomerania — Volume 1

  • DMZ, like the work of Bertolt Brecht, is a mirror, a kind of social gestus.

    PopMatters

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  • Gestus, as the embodiment of an attitude, carries at least two distinct meanings in Brecht's theatre: firstly, the uncovering or revealing of the motivations and transactions that underpin a dramatic exchange between the characters; secondly, the "epic" narration of that character by the actor (whether explicitly or implicitly).

    In the first sense, that of anatomizing the character, a Gestus reveals a specific aspect of a character: rather than his metaphysical, subconscious or other psychological dimensions, a Gestus makes visible a character's social relations and the causality of his behaviour, as interpreted from an historical materialist perspective. "Every emotion" when treated under the rubric of Gestus, Elizabeth Wright explains, "manifests itself as a set of social relations."2 "For it is what happens between people," Brecht insists, "that provides them with all the material that they can discuss, criticize, alter."

    -Wikipedia

    July 4, 2010