Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Having a surface covered with granules.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The main constituent of the starch grain or granule, in distinction from the framework of cellulose. It is coloured blue by iodine, and is converted into dextrin and sugar by boiling acids and amylolytic ferments.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The main constituent of the starch grain or granule, in distinction from the framework of cellulose. Unlike cellulose, it is colored blue by iodine, and is converted into dextrin and sugar by boiling acids and amylolytic ferments.
  • adj. Granular.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Same as granular.
  • n. One of the essential constituents of the starch-grain, which gives a characteristic blue color with iodine, and is converted into sugar by the ferment of saliva. It is distinguished from the other constituent, cellulose, by these two characteristics.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. composed of or covered with particles resembling meal in texture or consistency

Etymologies

granule +‎ -ose (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In the dark, he felt its surfaces to be some kind of granulose shingle, firm and silent beneath his boots.

    The Silent Tower

  • Il titolo assurdamente complicato vuol dire che le immagini sono granulose e che il personaggio sarà ostacolato da granelli di sabbia mentre tenta di costruire un muro immenso.

    No Fat Clips!!! : grain.S

  • This bursting frees the granulose, or the contents of the tiny granules, which are deposited in a network of cellulose, and as soon as this occurs it mixes with water and forms what is called soluble starch.

    Woman's Institute Library of Cookery Volume 1: Essentials of Cookery; Cereals; Bread; Hot Breads

  • Brucke gave the name erythrogranulose to a substance nearly related to granulose, but with a stronger affinity for iodine, and receiving from it not a blue but a red color.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 458, October 11, 1884

  • W. Nageli maintains that granulose, or soluble starch, differs from amylodextrin in the former being precipitated by tannic acid and acetate of lead, while the latter is not.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 458, October 11, 1884

  • If a mixture of filtered potato starch paste and erythrodextrin is dried in a watch glass covered with a thin pellicle of collodion, and a drop of iodine solution placed on the latter, it penetrates very slowly through the pellicle, the dextrin becoming first tinctured with red, and the granulose afterward with blue.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 458, October 11, 1884

  • The soluble filtrate from starch paste also contains a substance identical with granulose.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 458, October 11, 1884

  • Another difference maintained by Nageli, that freshly precipitated starch is insoluble, amylodextrin soluble in water, is also contested; the author finding that granulose is soluble to a considerable extent in water, not only immediately after precipitation, but when it has remained for twenty-four hours under absolute alcohol.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 458, October 11, 1884

  • Thallus granulose, verrucose, or areolate, rather better developed than those of the preceding genera as shown in the more frequent verrucose and areolate conditions; apothecia minute to large, sessile to immersed, the disk and the exciple usually black; hypothecium usually brown; hymenium pale to light brown; paraphyses usually distinct; spores brown,

    Ohio Biological Survey, Bull. 10, Vol. 11, No. 6 The Ascomycetes of Ohio IV and V

  • Thallus commonly granulose, and often passing into verrucose and chinky conditions, but scarcely ever areolate, sometimes scant and evanescent; apothecia usually minute or small, and commonly adnate, exciple weak and often becoming covered; hypothecium and hymenium passing from pale through shades of brown, the former becoming darker than the latter, this rarely tinged blue or violet above; spores hyaline, 2-celled.

    Ohio Biological Survey, Bull. 10, Vol. 11, No. 6 The Ascomycetes of Ohio IV and V

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