Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of gremlin.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I think my husband and I were for years annoying the fae by blaming their antics on "gremlins" - hidden/missing items you know the drill.

    Spoutwood Fairie Festival: Getting It Right

  • A cynic might suspect excess media coaching, but then it's not an easy thing to go on "Today" and discuss your inner "gremlins" -- which Spitzer said he was in the process of confronting, as though he were a cartoon action hero battling malevolent mogwai.

    Why is Eliot Spitzer on TV? Because disgrace doesn't stick like it used to.

  • In the published version of the book, the text refers to the gremlins wearing “green derbys,” or bowler hats, but all the drawings show them in flying helmets.

    Storyteller

  • Many of us like to think that aging is a magical process that happens deep within our bodies; that some so-called gremlins of gerontology ratchet down our cells and our systems so we grow old.

    You Staying Young

  • A: The gremlins are the offspring of a small, cuddly creature given as a Christmas gift.

    ScrippsNews

  • First, I don't think it was a matter of "gremlins" that lured former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer to become Client 9 with $4K-a-night trollop, Ashley Dupre.

    Lionel: Note To Spitzer: Gremilns?!

  • Eddie Mair sounded disappointed that due to 'gremlins' they couldnt go straight to a report from the UN about it, but no, hold on,let's wait, thanks to the wonders of technology they fixed the link and could indulge in some Israel-bashing.

    TUESDAY OPEN THREAD

  • Who are these "gremlins" Spitzer has tried to address and confront?

    Accentuate the Negative

  • The only time she doesn't seem to be suffering is when she's creating these detailed toles, but the toles end up being horrible creatures in miniature, such as gremlins, goblins, etc.

    May 31st, 2008

  • The driving game involves cars running over "gremlins," which in their pixelated form looked like pedestrians.

    Christian Science Monitor | All Stories

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  • from Dictionary.com

    grem?lin??/?gr?ml?n/ Show Spelled Pronunciation grem-lin Show IPA

    –noun 1. a mischievous invisible being, said by airplane pilots in World War II to cause engine trouble and mechanical difficulties.

    2. any cause of trouble, difficulties, etc.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Origin:

    1925–30; of obscure orig; in its earliest attested use, an RAF term for a low-ranking officer or enlisted man assigned the most onerous duties; later development perh. affected by phonetic resemblance to goblin

    Synonyms:

    1. See goblin.

    Dictionary.com Unabridged

    Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2009.

    Cite This Source |Link To gremlins

    grem·lin (gr?m'l?n)

    n.

    An imaginary gnomelike creature to whom mechanical problems, especially in aircraft, are attributed.

    A maker of mischief.

    Perhaps blend of Irish gruaimín, bad-tempered little fellow (from Middle Irish gruaim, gloom, surliness) and goblin.

    Word History: Elves, goblins, and trolls seem to be timeless creations of the distant past, but gremlins were born in the 20th century. In fact, gremlin is first recorded only in the 1920s, as a Royal Air Force term for a low-ranking officer or enlisted man saddled with oppressive assignments. Said to have been invented by members of the Royal Naval Air Service in World War I, gremlin is used in works written in the 1940s for "an imaginary gnomelike creature who causes difficulties in aircraft." The word seems likely to have been influenced by goblin, but accounts of its origin are various and none are certain. One source calls in Fremlin beer bottles to explain the word; another, the Irish Gaelic word gruaimín, "ill-humored little fellow." Whatever the word's origin, it is certain that gremlins have taken on a life of their own.

    May 27, 2009

  • grem?lin??/?gr?ml?n/ Show Spelled Pronunciation grem-lin Show IPA

    –noun 1. a mischievous invisible being, said by airplane pilots in World War II to cause engine trouble and mechanical difficulties.

    2. any cause of trouble, difficulties, etc.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Origin:

    1925–30; of obscure orig; in its earliest attested use, an RAF term for a low-ranking officer or enlisted man assigned the most onerous duties; later development perh. affected by phonetic resemblance to goblin

    Synonyms:

    1. See goblin.

    Dictionary.com Unabridged

    Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2009.

    Cite This Source |Link To gremlins

    grem·lin (gr?m'l?n)

    n.

    An imaginary gnomelike creature to whom mechanical problems, especially in aircraft, are attributed.

    A maker of mischief.

    Perhaps blend of Irish gruaimín, bad-tempered little fellow (from Middle Irish gruaim, gloom, surliness) and goblin.

    Word History: Elves, goblins, and trolls seem to be timeless creations of the distant past, but gremlins were born in the 20th century. In fact, gremlin is first recorded only in the 1920s, as a Royal Air Force term for a low-ranking officer or enlisted man saddled with oppressive assignments. Said to have been invented by members of the Royal Naval Air Service in World War I, gremlin is used in works written in the 1940s for "an imaginary gnomelike creature who causes difficulties in aircraft." The word seems likely to have been influenced by goblin, but accounts of its origin are various and none are certain. One source calls in Fremlin beer bottles to explain the word; another, the Irish Gaelic word gruaimín, "ill-humored little fellow." Whatever the word's origin, it is certain that gremlins have taken on a life of their own.

    May 27, 2009