Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One of the two curved wooden or metal pieces of a harness that fits around the neck of a draft animal and to which the traces are attached.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A covering, skin, membrane.
  • n. Part of the harness that fits round the neck of a draught horse that the reins pass through.
  • n. Scottish form of home
  • n. Alternative form of halm.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Home.
  • n. One of the two curved pieces of wood or metal, in the harness of a draught horse, to which the traces are fastened. They are fitted upon the collar, or have pads fitting the horse's neck attached to them.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A covering; a skin; a membrane.
  • n. One of two curved pieces of wood or metal in the harness of a draft-horse, to which the traces are fastened, and which lie upon the collar or have pads attached to them fitting the horse's neck. See cut under harness.
  • n. An obsolete or dialectal form of halm.
  • n. A Scotch form of home.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. stable gear consisting of either of two curved supports that are attached to the collar of a draft horse and that hold the traces

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English, from Middle Dutch; see tkei- in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English hame, home, from Old English hama, homa ("a cover, skin"), from Proto-Germanic *hamô (“clothes, skirt”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱam- (“cover, clothes”). Cognate with Danish ham ("skin, bladder, figure"), Danish hams ("shell, sleeve"). More at heaven.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English, from Middle Dutch hame ("horse collar, harness, fishnet"), from Old Dutch *hamo, from Proto-Germanic *hamô (“fishnet, collar for a horse”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱam- (“part of a harness”). Cognate with Middle Low German ham, hame ("collar, fishnet"), Old High German hamo ("sack-like fishnet") (Modern German dialectal Hame, Hamen ("hand fishnet"), Ham ("horse collar")).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English ham, from Old English hām ("home"). More at home.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From earlier haum, haume.

Examples

  • 'Come hame, come hame!' answered the _colonel_, with both accent and quantity heaped on the word _hame_.

    Adela Cathcart, Volume 1

  • Indeed it was his custom, though Elsie had not known it, to follow every funeral going to this, his favourite churchyard of Ruthven; and, possibly in imitation of its booming, for it was still tolled at the funerals, he had given the old bell the name of _the wow_, and had translated its monotonous clangour into the articulate sounds -- _come hame, come hame_.

    The Portent & Other Stories

  • Amidst the sounds of derision that followed him, might be heard the words frequently repeated -- "_Come hame, come hame_."

    The Portent & Other Stories

  • She sat in the churchyard of the ancient parish church of Ruthven; and when she lifted up her eyes, there she saw, in the half-ruined belfry, the old bell, all but hidden with ivy, which the passing wind had roused to utter one sleepy tone; and there beside her, stood the fool with the bell on his arm; and to him and to her the _wow o 'Rivven_ said, "_Come hame, come hame_!"

    The Portent & Other Stories

  • "One still night of summer, the nurse who watched by her bedside heard her murmur through her sleep, 'I hear it: _come hame -- come hame_.

    Adela Cathcart, Volume 1

  • One still night of summer, the nurse who watched by her bedside heard her murmur through her sleep, "I hear it: _come hame -- come hame_.

    The Portent & Other Stories

  • I am a quiet settler, whose business only is to mak a hame for my wife and bairn; but, if you ask me to drink success to the Congress and confusion to the king's troops, I tell you I willna do it; not even if you are brutal enough, but this I canna believe possible, to carry your threats into execution.

    True to the Old Flag A Tale of the American War of Independence

  • Prince Charlie cam 'hame' to Rome; and the refusal there of even a titular kingship.

    Pickle the Spy; Or, the Incognito of Prince Charles

  • "The evening brings a 'hame';" so should it be here -- should it especially be in a dramatic work.

    Robert Louis Stevenson: a record, an estimate, and a memorial

  • "The evening brings a '' hame '" and the end ought to show something to satisfy the innate craving (for it is innate, thank

    Robert Louis Stevenson: a record, an estimate, and a memorial

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  • June 25, 2007