Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A harpooner.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An harpooner.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as harpooner.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. someone who launches harpoons

Etymologies

harpoon +‎ -eer (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • According to the invariable usage of the fishery, the whale-boat pushes off from the ship, with the headsman or whale-killer as temporary steersman, and the harpooneer or whale-fastener pulling the foremost oar, the one known as the harpooneer-oar.

    Moby-Dick, or, The Whale

  • "Oh, no," said he, looking a sort of diabolically funny, "the harpooneer is a dark complexioned chap. He never eats dumplings, he don't -- he eats nothing but steaks, and he likes 'em rare."

    Moby Dick, or, the whale

  • 'Oh, no, 'said he, looking a sort of diabolically funny,' the harpooneer is a dark complexioned chap. He never eats dumplings, he don't -- he eats nothing but steaks, and likes 'em rare. '

    Moby-Dick, or, The Whale

  • “Oh, no,” said he, looking a sort of diabolically funny, “the harpooneer is a dark complexioned chap. He never eats dumplings, he don’t — he eats nothing but steaks, and he likes ‘em rare.”

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • No fair looking it up Now what was the name of the tattooed indian harpooneer in Moby Dick

    ConFicker

  • No fair looking it up Now what was the name of the tattooed indian harpooneer in Moby Dick | Field & Stream

    No fair looking it up Now what was the name of the tattooed indian harpooneer in Moby Dick

  • This improvement upon the original usage was introduced by no less a man than Stubb, in order to afford to the imperilled harpooneer the strongest possible guarantee for the faithfulness and vigilance of his monkey-rope holder.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • Concerning the officers of the whale-craft, this seems as good a place as any to set down a little domestic peculiarity on ship-board, arising from the existence of the harpooneer class of officers, a class unknown of course in any other marine than the whale-fleet.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • I concluded that this harpooneer, in the course of his distant voyages, must have met with a similar adventure.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • But though the other boarders kept coming in by ones, twos, and threes, and going to bed, yet no sign of my harpooneer.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.