Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To deceive or outmaneuver (a defending opponent) by a feint; fake.
  • intransitive verb To deceive or outmaneuver a defender by a feint.
  • noun A feint or fake.
  • noun A roadside or rural establishment offering liquor, dancing, and often gambling and prostitution.
  • intransitive verb To play dance music, especially in a juke.
  • intransitive verb To dance, especially in a juke or to the music of a jukebox.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • A dialectal variant of jouk.
  • See jouk.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb To bend the neck; to bow or duck the head.
  • intransitive verb obsolete To perch on anything, as birds do.
  • noun Prov. Eng. The neck of a bird.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To deceive or outmaneuver (someone) using a feint, especially in American football or soccer
  • noun A feint
  • noun southern, US A roadside cafe or bar, especially one with dancing and sometimes prostitution.
  • verb to play dance music, or to dance, in a juke

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun (football) a deceptive move made by a football player
  • noun a small roadside establishment in the southeastern United States where you can eat and drink and dance to music provided by a jukebox

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English jowken, to bend in a supple way.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Probably from Gullah juke, joog, disorderly, wicked, of West African origin; akin to Wolof dzug, to live wickedly, and Bambara dzugu, wicked.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English jowken ("bend")

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Gullah juke, joog ("wicked, disorderly") (compare Wolof and Bambara dzug ("unsavory")).

Examples

Comments

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  • I use "juked!" all the time.

    December 10, 2006

  • juke is also used as a verb, meaning to "stab".

    example: "Ask children where on the body it is safe to stab or 'juke' someone and the vast majority will say the leg or buttock" - The Daily Telegraph

    April 27, 2009