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Examples

  • And, as they continued to ply their oars, he called aloud, “Treason! treason!” rung the bell of the castle, and discharged his harquebuss at the boat.

    The Abbot

  • His equipment was soon complete, and, with his harquebuss on his shoulder (for though they retained the name of Archers, the Scottish Guard very early substituted firearms for the long bow, in the use of which their nation never excelled), he followed Master Oliver out of the barrack.

    Quentin Durward

  • The first impulse of his surprise was to free his harquebuss by a violent exertion, which made the King stagger backward into the hall.

    Quentin Durward

  • Quentin instantly fired his harquebuss — a man groaned and fell, and he himself, under the instant but vague discharge of a number of pieces, the fire of which ran in a disorderly manner along the column, and showed it to be very numerous, hastened back to the main guard.

    Quentin Durward

  • “Is your harquebuss loaded?” replied Oliver, without answering his query.

    Quentin Durward

  • One of the squires heard this, and raising the butt – end of his harquebuss would no doubt have broken Sancho's head with it had not Roque Guinart called out to him to hold his hand.

    Don Quixote

  • I like him not, with his laced band and feather, his book and lute: harquebuss and whinyard are the tools for these days.

    Rob of the bowl : a legend of St. Inigoe's,

  • The answer was returned in a still louder laugh, and in a shot fired at the challenger, the momentary light of the explosion revealing, as Dauntrees imagined, a cloaked figure presenting a harquebuss through the window.

    Rob of the bowl : a legend of St. Inigoe's,

  • In her dying depositions she accused Osio of having pushed her in; and there seems little doubt that he did so; for while she was struggling in the water, he disengaged his harquebuss from his mantle and struck her several blows upon the head and hands.

    Renaissance in Italy, Volumes 1 and 2 The Catholic Reaction

  • Ambrogio then made his way back to his lodgings, recharged his harquebuss, ate some supper and went to bed.

    Renaissance in Italy, Volumes 1 and 2 The Catholic Reaction

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  • Also arquebus.

    October 9, 2008

  • "an old fire-arm, which cocked by a wheel; it carried a three ounce ball. Obsolete." Also spelled harquebus.

    October 9, 2008