have yourself a merry little christmas love

have yourself a merry little christmas

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  • I had myself one!

    December 27, 2009

  • Precisely. :-)

    December 23, 2009

  • Me too, reesetee. I think it's the clarinet.

    December 22, 2009

  • Yes, that's it, I think. And I like them both. :-)

    December 22, 2009

  • I think of it as having the same emotional tone as "I'll Be Home for Christmas," which is to say, sad and regretful.

    December 22, 2009

  • Haha! Very sweet!

    Reading this thread, I was surprised to see how this song was interpreted. I have never thought of it as dark or patronising before. It just seems...well...a song of hope?: looking to the future, in a way.

    According to this source: There is a distinction between a Christmas carol and a Christmas song. A Christmas Carol has a fairly rapid, regular beat, which would, therefore, exclude a meandering, crooning song such as “White Christmas”.

    December 22, 2009

  • Have a Habanera Christmas,

    Like they do in old Seville.

    If the toreador doesn't get gored,

    Perhaps poor Carmen will....

    December 22, 2009

  • I would guess, according to its etymology, that a Christmas carol is one that sung in a chorus, going door-to-door. A Christmas song is just a more general category? So "Grandma got run over by a Reindeer" is a Christmas song, but not one you'd really sing in a group at someone's doorstep.

    December 22, 2009

  • For some reason I always thought a Carol was a bit like a Carmen.

    December 22, 2009

  • I was taught that a carol was a religious song--not necessarily related to a church service or practice (like hymns), but containing religious content. Christ vs. Santa Claus, in a way. :-)

    Ptero: You're right. *sniff*

    December 22, 2009

  • I just found a video clip of the original "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas", and man, it's a tearjerker.

    I can't shed any light on the carol/song distinction -- can anyone else enlighten us?

    December 21, 2009

  • Very interesting, ptero! Did not know that. I like the, gulp, Sinatra version best!

    I would sat that's a song rather than a carol -- but I'm not sure why.

    December 21, 2009

  • I actually like the song quite a lot. The lyrics and tune are beautiful. It's just that one line that always sort of rubbed me the wrong way. Anyway, the real question here, is what is the difference between a Christmas carol and a Christmas song?

    December 21, 2009

  • I don't find it patronizing either--actually, I never considered that until now, uselessness. But it is true, as ptero points out, that the original words were quite dark. Either way, it's one of my favorite Christmas tunes. :-)

    December 21, 2009

  • It's worth mentioning that the original song, as it appeared in "Meet Me In St. Louis", was a wistful, melancholy piece. The lyrics we sing today are rather cheerier than the lyrics that Judy Garland sang (as you can hear for yourself). I suspect that the reason why the phrase "merry little Christmas" sounds so dismissive is that it's a remnant of the original cynical lyrics.

    This article is fascinating, and definitely worth a read.

    December 21, 2009

  • Have it your way. Merry Christmas. Little? Yes, I can allow your feelings here, 'ness. Not a carol though, is it?

    December 21, 2009

  • I don't find this line patronizing at all. I much prefer a 'merry little Christmas' to, well, almost any other kind.

    December 21, 2009

  • What?!? *Goes to check sionnach's profile for clues*

    December 21, 2009

  • If you play it backwards, you can hear "santa is dead" over and over again.

    December 21, 2009

  • A patronizing line in an otherwise very nice Christmas carol. It also happens to be the song's (patronizing) title. Well isn't that just precious.

    December 21, 2009