Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. That which heightens.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who, or that which, heightens.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who or that which heightens.

Etymologies

heighten +‎ -er (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • It's a useful emotional heightener, that's all I know.

    Where's the show?

  • She had been fifty-four years the delight of my father's heart, the sweetener of all his toils, the comforter of all his sorrows, the sharer and heightener of all his joys.

    History of American Women

  • That wine was drunk, not merely for its taste, but as a heightener of sensation, is evident; but the "three hundred cups" so often mentioned bear no such significance as might at first appear when the size of the cups is taken into account.

    Fir-Flower Tablets: Poems Translated From the Chinese

  • Such a record may yield invaluable service as a heightener and interpreter of individual experience; to the last we find Martineau attaching a profound and quite special significance to the revelation in

    Unitarianism

  • Still further, we have here a symbol of Christ's glory as the ennobler and heightener of all earthly joys.

    Expositions of Holy Scripture St. John Chapters I to XIV

  • They assur'd me that I was so perfectly to their taste as to have but one fault against me, which I might easily be cur'd of, and that was my modesty: this, they observ'd, might pass for a beauty the more with those who wanted it for a heightener; but their maxim was, that it was an impertinent mixture, and dash'd the cup so as to spoil the sincere draught of pleasure; they consider'd it accordingly as their mortal enemy, and gave it no quarter wherever they met with it.

    Fanny Hill, Part VII (second letter)

  • They assured me that I was so perfectly to their taste as to have but one fault against me, which I might easily be cured of, and that was my modesty: this, they observed, might pass for a beauty the more with those who wanted it for a heightener; but their maxim was, that it was an impertinent mixture, and dashed the cup so as to spoil the sincere draught of pleasure; they considered it accordingly as their mortal enemy, and gave it no quarter wherever they met with it.

    Memoirs of Fanny Hill.

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