Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In the state of Chihuahua, Mexico, the name of the narcotic cactus Lophophora Williamsii, a plant held in high esteem by the Indians. See mescal-button.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • To gather hikuli the Tarahumara traveled far to the east and south, beyond the foothills of the Sierra and into the desert.

    One River

  • Once safely home, the Tarahumara would spread the hikuli on blankets, sprinkle blood over the top, and then carefully store the dried plants until the women were ready to grind them on a metate into a thick brown liquid.

    One River

  • Once safely home, the Tarahumara would spread the hikuli on blankets, sprinkle blood over the top, and then carefully store the dried plants until the women were ready to grind them on a metate into a thick brown liquid.

    One River

  • For the Tarahumara peyote was hikuli, the spirit being that sits next to Father Sun.

    One River

  • One man told Lumholtz of returning from the desert and trying to use his bag of hikuli as a pillow at night.

    One River

  • To gather hikuli the Tarahumara traveled far to the east and south, beyond the foothills of the Sierra and into the desert.

    One River

  • Then, with the first sign of the sun, the shaman and the people would face east and wave farewell to the hikuli, a spirit that had descended on the wings of green doves, only to depart in the company of an owl.

    One River

  • One man told Lumholtz of returning from the desert and trying to use his bag of hikuli as a pillow at night.

    One River

  • For the Tarahumara peyote was hikuli, the spirit being that sits next to Father Sun.

    One River

  • Then, with the first sign of the sun, the shaman and the people would face east and wave farewell to the hikuli, a spirit that had descended on the wings of green doves, only to depart in the company of an owl.

    One River

Comments

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  • In Náhuatl: péyotl.

    January 24, 2013