Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. superlative form of horrid: most horrid.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Lord Lansdowne reminded his fellow peers that Cromwell had warned of anything which would create ‘an omnipotent House of Commons — the horridest arbitrariness of anything that ever existed in the world’.

    The Spectator's Notes

  • Queer incommunicable joy it is, the joy of the vivid phrase that turns the statement of the horridest fact to beauty!

    The History of Mr. Polly

  • The spear-fanged cat is surely the most horridest murderer this shuddering world hath seen, yet there is for him prey worthy of his mettle, what with beavers near big as our bears, wild oxen whose horns are to those of our familiar kine as the spear-fanged cat's teeth to the lion's, and the great hairy elephants which do roam the forests.

    A different flesh

  • Now the climax was coming — "The Swine Brook runneth red this day with the blood of the servants of the Lord, shed by those men of Belial whose cause is the horridest arbitrariness that was ever exercised in this world."

    War Game

  • Boys are all horrid; but he 's the horridest one I ever saw.

    An Old-Fashioned Girl

  • Brewster the horridest-looking child! said Eliza, who had the second grade all to herself, although Molly now read out of the second reader with her.

    Understood Betsy

  • Charles Stuart MacAllister was without doubt the horridest, horridest boy that ever lived and she would never speak to him again -- no, not if she lived to be two hundred and went over to his place every Saturday for a thousand years.

    'Lizbeth of the Dale

  • "My! Isn't that 'Lias Brewster the horridest-looking child!" said Eliza, who had the second grade all to herself, although Molly now read out of the second reader with her.

    Understood Betsy

  • Howat, how I hate myself; the horridest things go round and round through my mind.

    The Three Black Pennys A Novel

  • It stood aloof from civilization, the tracts that had once been its indigo fields given over to their first noxious wildness, and grown up into one of the horridest marshes within a circuit of fifty miles.

    Southern Prose and Poetry for Schools

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