Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective nautical Of a ship at a distance that the hull is visible above the horizon

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Without any control, the cruiser turned broadside to the wind and was rolled hull-up by a big wave.

    State Of War

  • They had kept her hull-up until sunset, firing several shots after her, but the next morning she was nowhere to be seen.

    Tarzan of the Apes

  • They had kept her hull-up until sunset, firing several shots after her, but the next morning she was nowhere to be seen.

    Tarzan of the Apes

  • And there, at last, they perceived the fleet, hull-up above the horizon, in plain sight, with every sail set, carrying on after the pirate at their utmost speed.

    Across the Spanish Main A Tale of the Sea in the Days of Queen Bess

  • At length, after I had been aboard about half-an-hour, I was ready to return to our own ship; I therefore ordered two hands down into the boat alongside, and shoved off for the _Europa_, noting, with great satisfaction as I did so, that the breeze was fast dropping, and that the two Indiamen were still hull-up, not having made very much progress to windward during the time that I had been aboard the prize.

    A Middy of the King A Romance of the Old British Navy

  • At length, when we had brought the chase fairly hull-up it became apparent that, thanks to the pains taken by the skipper to improve our rate of sailing, the _Eros_ was now a trifle the faster vessel of the two; and that, consequently, nothing short of an accident could prevent us from getting alongside the chase.

    A Middy of the Slave Squadron A West African Story

  • Another twenty minutes and she was hull-up from my point of observation, by which time there was no further room for doubt, and I descended to the deck to acquaint the captain with the success of his strategy.

    A Middy of the Slave Squadron A West African Story

  • They were under royals, with studding-sails set on both sides, and despite the fact that they were so much bigger than ourselves, we overhauled them so rapidly that by sunset we had brought them hull-up, and had neared them so closely that we were not only able to identify them as line-of-battle ships, but, with the aid of Renouf's splendid telescope, were able to read several of the names emblazoned upon their sterns.

    The Log of a Privateersman

  • Approaching each other as we were, nearly end on, we rose each other very rapidly; and at length we in the _Dolphin_ had the satisfaction of seeing the frigate, the vessel most distant from us, fairly hull-up.

    The Rover's Secret A Tale of the Pirate Cays and Lagoons of Cuba

  • We were consequently sailing at right angles to the stranger, and rather drawing away from the line of her course than otherwise; yet such was the speed with which she came along that in half an hour she was hull-up from our deck.

    The Rover's Secret A Tale of the Pirate Cays and Lagoons of Cuba

Comments

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  • Adjective describing a ship whose hull is visible on the horizon, as opposed to hull-down.

    March 3, 2008