Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun An old medical theory founded on the part which the humors were supposed to play in the production of disease; Galenism.
  • noun The manner or disposition of a humorist.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Med.) The theory founded on the influence which the humors were supposed to have in the production of disease; Galenism.
  • noun The manner or disposition of a humorist; humorousness.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun medicine, historical The theory of the influence of the humors in the production of disease.
  • noun The manner or disposition of a humorist; humorousness.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

humor +‎ -ism

Examples

  • 'The rural lives of some of these bearded men included the "Saturday Night Bath" as a reality rather than a humorism.

    Summer Qassim: Beard Feared, Sheared

  • In certain fits of prosaic humorism, he would, as we have seen, condemn himself to delineation of the parades of a watering-place; but the moment he permitted himself to be enthusiastic, vaster imaginations crowded in upon him: to modify his old conception in the least, was to exaggerate it; the mount of

    The Harbours of England

  • I expected to find the ravings of an enthusiast, or the sullen snarlings of an infidel; whereas I found the very soul of Swift -- an intense half self-deceived humorism.

    Specimens of the Table Talk of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

  • Not to be confused with "a sense of humor" (which we all know is important for wellness), humorism theory held that the human body was filled with four basic substances, called "the four humors," which are in balance when a person is healthy.

    Chattanooga Pulse

  • 'The rural lives of some of these bearded men included the "Saturday Night Bath" as a reality rather than a humorism.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • ng Meeting 7 is available online at www.randi.org Bio: Fintan Steele, director of scientific education and communications at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, traces the history of personalized medicine from Hippocrates and humorism to ‘overhyped’ modern day incarnations.

    2010 April 09 | TECHNOLOGY NEWS

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.