hyperthermophile love

hyperthermophile

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of various organisms, such as certain bacteria and archaea, requiring temperatures of 80°C (176°F) or higher to thrive.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun biology An organism that lives and thrives in an extremely hot environment, such as a deep sea smoker vent; often a member of the Archaea.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From hyper- +‎ thermophile.

Examples

  • Analysis of the "tree of life" derived from ribosomal RNA has led to the suggestion that the common ancestor of all life was a hyperthermophile (an organism adapted to very high temperatures)

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  • Analysis of the "tree of life" derived from ribosomal RNA has led to the suggestion that the common ancestor of all life was a hyperthermophile (an organism adapted to very high temperatures)

    Home

  • Analysis of the "tree of life" derived from ribosomal RNA has led to the suggestion that the common ancestor of all life was a hyperthermophile (an organism adapted to very high temperatures)

    Home

  • Analysis of the "tree of life" derived from ribosomal RNA has led to the suggestion that the common ancestor of all life was a hyperthermophile (an organism adapted to very high temperatures)

    Home

  • Analysis of the "tree of life" derived from ribosomal RNA has led to the suggestion that the common ancestor of all life was a hyperthermophile (an organism adapted to very high temperatures)

    Home

  • Analysis of the "tree of life" derived from ribosomal RNA has led to the suggestion that the common ancestor of all life was a hyperthermophile (an organism adapted to very high temperatures)

    Home

  • The scientists propose, then, that crenarchaeal viruses have simply maintained their originally diverse morphologies, whereas viruses of non-hyperthermophile hosts (including other crenarchaeal viruses) have not.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • The scientists propose, then, that crenarchaeal viruses have simply maintained their originally diverse morphologies, whereas viruses of non-hyperthermophile hosts (including other crenarchaeal viruses) have not.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • Analysis of the "tree of life" derived from ribosomal RNA has led to the suggestion that the common ancestor of all life was a hyperthermophile (an organism adapted to very high temperatures)

    Home

  • The scientists propose, then, that crenarchaeal viruses have simply maintained their originally diverse morphologies, whereas viruses of non-hyperthermophile hosts (including other crenarchaeal viruses) have not.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

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