Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of hypha.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n.pl. The long, branching filaments of which the mycelium (and the greater part of the plant) of a fungus is formed. They are also found enveloping the gonidia of lichens, making up a large part of their structure.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "When spores reach a favorable place to grow, they germinate and send out long, thin filaments called hyphae," she said.

    The Times Today's News

  • The feces of both species consisted mainly of brownish plant fragments and some microscopic fungal hyphae. (9 words shorter.)

    Archive 2009-04-01

  • However, profuse signs of white hyphae and conidia growing on bat muzzle.

    Going Mutant

  • Surface hyphae and conidia flake off skin surface easily but have clearly penetrated deep into bat tissue.

    Going Mutant

  • Although it is not known if this trend also applies to the species diversity of fungal mycelia (the belowground network of fungal filaments or hyphae), it is clear that the amount of fungal hyphae is low in the Arctic [62].

    Implications of current species distributions for future biotic change in the Arctic

  • The microscopic examinations of the feces of both species indicated that they consisted mainly of brownish plant fragments and smaller fractions of microscopic fungal hyphae.

    An exercise in concise writing

  • The feces of both species consisted mainly of brownish plant fragments and some microscopic fungal hyphae. 9 words shorter.

    An exercise in concise writing

  • Next comes the medulla, which consists of loosely packed hyphae and within which a number of substances produced by the lichen are stored.

    Lichen

  • The thallus consists of 3 or 4 layers of cells or hyphae.

    Lichen

  • Below the upper cortex is the algal layer, in which algal cells are scattered among strands of hyphae.

    Lichen

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