Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A mood disorder that is milder than mania and marked by symptoms of elevated or agitated mood, especially as a component of bipolar disorder.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A mildly maniacal state of short duration.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun medicine A mild form of mania, especially the phase of several mood disorders characterized by euphoria or hyperactivity.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From hypo- +‎ mania, after German Hypomanie.

Examples

  • Mild mania, often the start of a stronger mania or even the bipolar illness itself, is called hypomania.

    The Ups and Downs of Raising a Bipolar Child

  • Mild mania, often the start of a stronger mania or even the bipolar illness itself, is called hypomania.

    The Ups and Downs of Raising a Bipolar Child

  • Mild mania, often the start of a stronger mania or even the bipolar illness itself, is called hypomania.

    The Ups and Downs of Raising a Bipolar Child

  • Mild mania, often the start of a stronger mania or even the bipolar illness itself, is called hypomania.

    The Ups and Downs of Raising a Bipolar Child

  • But hypomania, which is also a symptom of the disorder, is a high-energy state in which a person feels exuberant but hasn't lost his or her grip on reality.

    Bipolar Disorder: 10 Subtle Signs

  • There's two types of bipolar disorder, type one, where people have frank manic states, and type two, where they have lower levels of mania called hypomania, where they're still kind of connected to reality, but they're very active; they don't need to sleep very much.

    CNN Transcript Dec 7, 2005

  • Today they would more likely be termed "hypomania," a fair diagnosis for any individual who manages single-handedly to found a library, fire company, police force, hospital, university, insurance company, sanitation department and militia.

    Archive 2006-01-01

  • Psychiatrist Dr Anthony Durrell told an appeal hearing earlier this year that Einfeld displayed symptoms of "hypomania", manifesting itself in grandiose ideas about himself.

    AustralianIT.com.au | Top Stories

  • He said Einfeld displayed symptoms of "hypomania", demonstrating grandiose ideas about his altruistic pursuits including the plight of Aborigines and the Jewish/Palestine conflict.

    AustralianIT.com.au | Top Stories

  • During the interviews, he said Einfeld displayed symptoms of "hypomania", demonstrating grandiose ideas about his altruistic pursuits.

    Latest News - Yahoo!7 News

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