Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Not laudable; not to be approved or commended; provoking censure; blameworthy.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Not laudable; not praise-worthy; worthy of censure or disapprobation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Not laudable; unpraiseworthy.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Late Latin illaudabilis.

Examples

  • Sir Hugh could now repair the omissions of his youth; but he was willing to console his want of knowledge, and sooth his mortifications; and while he grieved for his bodily infirmities, and pitied his mental repinings, he considered his idea as not illaudable, though injudicious, and in favour of its blamelessness, forgave its absurdity.

    Camilla

  • Sir Ch. Not satisfied with your own acknowledgment; as I know that young ladies are too ant to make secrets of a passion that is not in itself illaudable [I know not why, when proper persons make enqui-ries, and for motives not ungenerous]; I asked your elder sister, who scrupled not to own hers, whether there were any one man, whom you preferred to an-other?

    Sir Charles Grandison

  • Whereupon it came to passe, that all the commendable parts of speech were set foorth by the name of figures, and all the illaudable partes vnder the name of vices, or viciosities, of both which it shall bee spoken in their places.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • The "Verses on the Unfortunate Lady" have drawn much attention by the illaudable singularity of treating suicide with respect; and they must be allowed to be written in some parts with vigorous animation, and in others with gentle tenderness; nor has Pope produced any poem in which the sense predominates more over the diction.

    Lives of the English Poets: Prior, Congreve, Blackmore, Pope

  • But Marianne abhorred all concealment where no real disgrace could attend unreserve; and to aim at the restraint of sentiments which were not in themselves illaudable, appeared to her not merely an unnecessary effort, but a disgraceful subjection of reason to common-place and mistaken notions.

    Sense and Sensibility

  • But Marianne abhorred all concealment where no real disgrace could attend unreserve; and to aim at the restraint of sentiments which were not in themselves illaudable, appeared to her not merely an unnecessary effort, but a disgraceful subjection of reason to common-place and mistaken notions.

    Sense and Sensibility

  • But in the second place, admitting that the apostle's design here is to discountenance this practice, not only as weak and illaudable, but also as sinful and disallowable; yet I affirm, that he accounted it not sinful from the very nature of the action, but only the irregularity of the circumstance; that they went to law upon every slight occasion, before unbelievers, in verse 1.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. VII.

  • But whilst I blame the illaudable customs of the inconsiderate, I rejoice in the number of the worthy.

    The Wife; or, Caroline Herbert

  • But Marianne abhorred all concealment where no real disgrace could attend unreserve; and to aim at the restraint of sentiments which were not in themselves illaudable, appeared to her not merely an unnecessary effort, but a disgraceful subjection of reason to common-place and mistaken notions.

    Sense and Sensibility

  • But Marianne abhorred all concealment where no real disgrace could attend unreserve; and to aim at the restraint of sentiments which were not in themselves illaudable, appeared to her not merely an unnecessary effort, but a disgraceful subjection of reason to common – place and mistaken notions.

    Sense and Sensibility

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