Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The quality of being incessant; unintermitted continuance.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The quality of being incessant; unintermitted continuance; unceasingness.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The quality of being incessant; unceasingness.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the quality of something that continues without end or interruption

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From incessant.

Examples

  • Now I open the small strip signal drink small volt Canada liquor but the small gin anything does not help me to surround here and the incessancy the voice ….

    Wind Chimes

  • Now I open the small strip signal drink small volt Canada liquor but the small gin anything does not help me to surround here and the incessancy the voice ….

    Wind Chimes

  • Mark Twain, in his “last and best of life for which the first was made,” seems to be advancing rapidly to a position which makes him a kind of joint Aristides, Solon, and Themistocles of the American metropolis — an Aristides for justness and boldness as well as incessancy of opinion, a Solon for wisdom and cogency, and a Themistocles for the democracy of his views and the popularity of his person.

    Mark Twain: A Biography

  • And afterward he would come home with a headache, and ghostly fiddles would vex him all night long with their thin incessancy.

    Gallantry Dizain des Fetes Galantes

  • But now fatigue a little deadened him to that incessancy of life, it seemed now just an eternal circling.

    The World Set Free

  • Mark Twain, in his "last and best of life for which the first was made," seems to be advancing rapidly to a position which makes him a kind of joint Aristides, Solon, and Themistocles of the American metropolis -- an Aristides for justness and boldness as well as incessancy of opinion, a Solon for wisdom and cogency, and a

    Mark Twain, a Biography. Complete

  • Mark Twain, in his "last and best of life for which the first was made," seems to be advancing rapidly to a position which makes him a kind of joint Aristides, Solon, and Themistocles of the American metropolis -- an Aristides for justness and boldness as well as incessancy of opinion, a Solon for wisdom and cogency, and a

    Mark Twain, a Biography — Volume III, Part 1: 1900-1907

  • They must have affected Shakspere as they have done so many others; and in point of fact his work, from HAMLET forth, shows a gain in nervous tension and pith, fairly attributable to the stirring impact of the style of Montaigne, with its incessancy of stroke, its opulence of colour, its hardy freshness of figure and epithet, its swift, unflagging stride.

    Montaigne and Shakspere

  • Nazianzen reporteth of his Sister Gorgonia, that by reason of the incessancy of her prayers; her knees seemed to cleave to the Earth.

    The Gentlewoman's Companion: or,%0AA Guide to the Female Sex

  • In the meantime, a Stepford-child demeanour, robot-like in its submission to the grand scheme of things, will be imbued with precise incessancy into students.

    nst online

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