Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adv. In an indifferent manner.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adv. In an indifferent manner; without distinction or preference; impartially; without concern, wish, affection, or aversion; tolerably; passably.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In an indifferent, manner; without difference or distinction; impartially; without concern or preference.
  • Not particularly well, but still not ill; tolerably; passably.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adv. with indifference; in an indifferent manner

Etymologies

indifferent +‎ -ly (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • II. ii.19 (340,5) he wav'd indifferently] That is, _he would wave indifferently_.

    Notes to Shakespeare, Volume III: The Tragedies

  • I have met with, and treated, as my book shows, fifty-seven cases of this kind of vision, which I term indifferently

    Green Tea

  • I have met with, and treated, as my book shows, fifty-seven cases of this kind of vision, which I term indifferently "sublimated,"

    Green Tea; Mr. Justice Harbottle

  • He uttered the word indifferently, and as though his mind were on something else.

    Les Miserables

  • Children usually prefer the game called indifferently Togantog and Saddikiya.

    First footsteps in East Africa

  • Some writers have considered that Mechtilde von Hackeborn and Mechtilde von Wippra were two distinct persons, but, as the Barons of Hackeborn were also Lords of Wippra, it was customary for members of that family to take their name indifferently from either, or both of these estates.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

  • As if it were so much water -- in short, indifferently -- P. Sybarite tossed it off.

    The Day of Days An Extravaganza

  • The local washerwoman replied that it was perhaps a very good plan of Miss or Mrs. Fawley's (as they called her indifferently) to have him with her -- "to kip ee company in your loneliness, fetch water, shet the winder-shet-ters o nights, and help in the bit o 'baking."

    Jude the Obscure

  • The local washerwoman replied that it was perhaps a very good plan of Miss or Mrs. Fawley's (as they called her indifferently) to have him with her -- "to kip 'ee company in your loneliness, fetch water, shet the winder-shet-ters o' nights, and help in the bit o 'baking."

    Jude the Obscure

  • Indeed one of the best criticks of our age [1] suggests to me, that 'the word indifferently being used in the sense of without concern' and being also very unpoetical, renders it improbable that they should have been his composition.

    Life Of Johnson

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