Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act of interweaving or the state of being interwoven.
  • n. Something interwoven.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of interweaving, or the state of being interwoven.
  • n. That which is interwoven.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of interweaving, or the state of being interwoven; that which is interwoven.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of interweaving; the condition of being interwoven; joint or combined texture.

Etymologies

From Latin intertextus, past participle of intertexere, to interweave : inter-, inter- + texere, to weave; see text.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
inter- +‎ texture (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Immediately they conducted Candide to a beautiful pavilion adorned with a colonade of green marble, spotted with yellow, and with an intertexture of vines, which served as a kind of cage for parrots, humming-birds, guinea-hens, and all other curious kinds of birds.

    Candide

  • Gothic romance: "Now the co-presence of something regular, something to which the mind has been accustomed in various moods and in a less excited state, cannot but have great efficacy in tempering and restraining the passion by an intertexture of ordinary feeling, and of feeling not strictly and necessarily connected with the passion" (609).

    Gothic Visions, Romantic Acoustics

  • STRANGER: And the threads which are more loosely spun, having a softness proportioned to the intertexture of the warp and to the degree of force used in dressing the cloth, — the threads which are thus spun are called the woof, and the art which is set over them may be called the art of spinning the woof.

    The Statesman

  • For when that part of the art of composition which is employed in the working of wool forms a web by the regular intertexture of warp and woof, the entire woven substance is called by us a woollen garment, and the art which presides over this is the art of weaving.

    The Statesman

  • They say that the inhabitants attach leaden weights to the tips of their arrows and therewith bring down the nests, and from the intertexture collect the cinnamon sticks.

    The History of Animals

  • It is not easy to imagine a mechanical analogue of the brain that could faithfully reproduce the intertexture of all the types of thinking appropriate to all the situations that human beings confront, together with the nonlogical modes through which ideas are associated in the “stream of consciousness.”

    Dictionary of the History of Ideas

  • Or is it true, as Shelley seems to aver that such a poem is never an ideal unity, but a collection of inspired lines and phrases connected "by the intertexture of conventional phrases?"

    The Poet's Poet : essays on the character and mission of the poet as interpreted in English verse of the last one hundred and fifty years

  • Immediately they conducted Candide to a beautiful pavilion adomed with a colonnade of green marble, spotted with yellow, and with an intertexture of vines, which served as a kind of cage for parrots, humming birds, guinea hens, and all other curious kinds of birds.

    Candide

  • His hair was cropped close, and the unevennesses of his cranium, thus laid bare, would have struck a phrenologist by reason of the strange intertexture of contradictory propensities.

    A Hero of Our Time

  • The lake by which we had travelled for some time ended in a river, which we passed by a bridge, and came to another glen, with a collection of huts, called Auknashealds; the huts were generally built of clods of earth, held together by the intertexture of vegetable fibres, of which earth there are great levels in Scotland which they call mosses.

    Selected English Letters

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