Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The act of obtruding; an undue and unsolicited thrusting forward of something upon the notice or attention of others, or that which is obtruded or thrust forward: as, the obtrusion of crude opinions on the world.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act of obtruding; a thrusting upon others by force or unsolicited.
  • noun That which is obtruded.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun An interference or intrusion
  • noun An encroachment beyond proper limits

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I have no right to mar the great end of a great history, by any obtrusion of my own weak self.

    Dombey and Son

  • A lovely site; and one whjich shows very well what a forced and bloody obtrusion upon England and its people the bloody "Reformation" was.

    An Interesting site

  • It appears to us as a certain disproportion in the picture, caused by the obtrusion of the whims of the painter.

    Uncollected Prose

  • A less pardonable eccentricity is the cold and gratuitous obtrusion of licentious images, not so much the suggestion of merriment as of bitterness.

    Uncollected Prose

  • He was breathing shallowly, clearly trying to make as little obtrusion of his presence as possible.

    A Breath of Snow and Ashes

  • ANY way was an act of violence, for what did it consist of but the obtrusion of the idea of grossness and guilt on a small helpless creature who had been for me a revelation of the possibilities of beautiful intercourse?

    The Turn of the Screw

  • Congress grumbled at “the unsolicited obtrusion of his advice,” as Edmund Randolph put it in a letter to James Madison, even as it voted to erect a bronze equestrian statue of him in Roman dress with a truncheon in his right hand and a laurel wreath encircling his brow.

    Angel in the Whirlwind

  • There were birds, huge crows that cawed and flapped their wings at Amanda's obtrusion, tiny sparrows that swooped and dove and, twittered, and far off, the regal splendor of an eagle gliding on a high, soundless wind.

    Wyoming Territory

  • Congress grumbled at “the unsolicited obtrusion of his advice,” as Edmund Randolph put it in a letter to James Madison, even as it voted to erect a bronze equestrian statue of him in Roman dress with a truncheon in his right hand and a laurel wreath encircling his brow.

    Angel in the Whirlwind

  • Vatican lay against the land, now a part of it, growing out of the land as if it had sprouted roots deep into its soil - not a glaring obtrusion, but something that had grown as naturally as trees, blending into the biota of the planet.

    Project Pope

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