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Examples

  • The word intuition comes from the Latin intueri, which means “to look upon”; it refers to our ability to observe a situation instantaneously, without our sense perception or our logic acting as intermediary.

    The Answer

  • [4900] Clitiphon ingenuously confesseth, that he no sooner came in Leucippe's presence, but that he did corde tremere, et oculis lascivius intueri; [4901] he was wounded at the first sight, his heart panted, and he could not possibly turn his eyes from her.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Si cui intueri vacet quae patiuntur superstitiosi, invenies tam indecora honestis, tam indigna liberis, tam dissimilia sanis, ut nemo fuerit dubitaturus furere eos, si cum paucioribus fuerent.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Insitum mortalibus a natura recentem aliorem felicitatem aegris oculis intueri, hist.l. 2.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • * [6833] Te quod attinet non sumus solliciti, — illud modo desideramus, ut patrem nobis vel semel intueri concedatur.

    Of Communion with God the Father, Son and Holy Ghost

  • [36] “Te quod attinet non sumus solliciti, — illud modo desideramus, ut patrem nobis vel semel intueri concedatur.” —

    Of Communion with God the Father, Son and Holy Ghost

  • * [3209] Te quod attinet non sumus solliciti, — illud modo desideramus, ut patrem nobis vel semel intueri concedatur.

    Of Communion with God the Father, Son and Holy Ghost

  • ’ He adds that writers of the Old Comedy were often commended even for these: ‘but it is enough for us to mind our present business—sed nobis nostrum opus intueri sat est.

    XII. On Style

  • Intuition (Latin intueri, to look into) is a psychological and philosophical term which designates the process of immediate apprehension or perception of an actual fact, being, or relation between two terms and its results.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • Neque enim quod ante oculos situm est, suffecerit intueri; rerum exitus prudentia metitur eademque in alterutro mutabilitas nec formidandas fortunae minas nec exoptandas facit esse blanditias.

    The Theological Tractates and The Consolation of Philosophy

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