Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In medieval universities, a disputation concerning the canon law, which had to be performed by every bachelor in law.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He stopped as the answer to the question which had been dogging him earlier rose unbidden in his mind: Audley would certainly know what 'propositum' and 'taberna' meant – he must remember to ask him at the next opportunity.

    The Alamut Ambush

  • "Sed propositum salutis et eos amplectitur, qui Creatorem agnoscunt, inter quos imprimis Musulmanos, qui fidem Abrahae se tenere profitentes, nobiscum Deum adorant unicum, misericordem, homines die novissimo iudicaturum." from Lumen Gentium §16.

    CONFIRMED

  • For each step n of the disputation, beginning with the first propositum as step 1, the propositum is

    Medieval Theories of Obligationes

  • It is a factor in determining the correct replies, but only when the propositum is irrelevant.

    Medieval Theories of Obligationes

  • The specification of these notions and of how they affect the correct response to the propositum constitutes the kernel of the theory of positio, and varied from author to author.

    Medieval Theories of Obligationes

  • That is, for him, a propositum is "sequentially relevant" if and only if it logically follows from the positum alone; it is "incompatibly relevant" if and only if its contradictory opposite follows from the positum alone; it is "irrelevant" if and only if it is neither sequentially nor incompatibly relevant.

    Medieval Theories of Obligationes

  • No given disputation ever requires the respondent to give different replies to the same propositum at different steps.

    Medieval Theories of Obligationes

  • The propositum q follows from the positum and the conceded proposition in step 1.

    Medieval Theories of Obligationes

  • For each step n of the disputation, and for each propositum p, the respondent must concede p at step

    Medieval Theories of Obligationes

  • To each such propositum the respondent must reply by saying "I concede it,"

    Medieval Theories of Obligationes

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