Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An ancient Hebrew instrument, probably of the zither or lyre class, but possibly a harp: translated ‘harp’ in the English Bible.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Some think the word kinnor denotes the whole class of stringed instruments.

    Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • The name kinnor is said to have been Phoenician, a fact which points to this as the source of its derivation.

    A Popular History of the Art of Music From the Earliest Times Until the Present

  • Many of the different names of musical instruments in the common version of the Scriptures are merely blunders of the Septuagint translators, who rendered the word kinnor by about six different terms, where no distinction had been originally intended by the sacred writers.

    A Popular History of the Art of Music From the Earliest Times Until the Present

  • Continuing on with my unintentional yet alluring theme of "musical instruments of the ancient Mediterranean", I'm lately exploring the whole issue with the stringed instrument known as a kinnor which is variously translated as a zither or a lyre.

    Archive 2010-08-01

  • The kinnor was a small harp having from ten to twenty strings.

    A Popular History of the Art of Music From the Earliest Times Until the Present

  • As for the "kinnor" conundrum, I'm tentatively assuming Minoan *ki-nauro for now with the same element *ki 'three'.

    The kithara

  • A sidenote: what do you think of the origins of other lyre-like instruments, like the Egyptian kissar or the Israelite kinnor?

    The kithara

  • There is much evidence that kinnor is from some underlying Mediterranean substrate.

    The kithara

  • If it's true that the name of the kithara is ultimately from a Minoan compound meaning 'three-stringed' and containing the element *ki 'three' see Paleoglot: The kithara, then it stands to reason that the similar name, kinnor, is probably likewise Minoan in origin and containing the same petrified numeral with a different second component.

    On to the kinnor

  • Somewhere in my very wiring is a yearning for the Old City of Jerusalem, and Ofra Haza singing “Ha-lo le-khol shirayikh/Ani kinnor” For all your songs, I am a violin expressed that as profoundly as can be.

    2004 August - Danya Ruttenberg

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