Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The hart in its second year; a young deer.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The hart in its second year; a young deer.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as knobber.—
  • n. In metallurgy, same as nobbler.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • All I have to say about This Modern World is "Crapulent snurf machine knob knobbler!"

    Firedoglake » Face the Snark

  • So long was the chase that when the greyhounds pulled down the knobbler, we were out of hearing of your bugles; and having rewarded and coupled the dogs, I gave them to be led by the jester, and we wandered in quest of our company, whom, it would seem, the sport had led in a different direction.

    Waverley

  • So long was the chase, that when the greyhounds pulled down the knobbler, we were out of hearing of your bugles; and having rewarded and coupled the dogs, I gave them to be led by the jester, and we wandered in quest of our company, whom it would seem the sport had led in a different direction.

    The Waverley

  • Drawslot; ` ` here have I been telling him, that all the marks were those of a buck of the first head, and he has halloed the hounds upon a velvet-headed knobbler!

    The Waverley

  • ` ` I trow, '' said Peter Lanaret, ` ` I know the reason of the noble lord's absence; for when that mooncalf, Gregory, hallooed the dogs upon the knobbler, and galloped like a green hilding, as he is, after them, I saw the

    The Waverley

  • So long was the chase that, when the greyhounds pulled down the knobbler, we were out of hearing of your bugles; and having rewarded and coupled the dogs, I gave them to be led by the jester, and we wandered in quest of our company, whom it would seem the sport had led in a different direction.

    Waverley — Volume 1

  • 'May the foul fiend, booted and spurred, ride down his bawling throat with a scythe at his girdle,' quoth Albert Drawslot; 'here have I been telling him that all the marks were those of a buck of the first head, and he has hallooed the hounds upon a velvet-headed knobbler!

    Waverley — Volume 1

  • [Footnote: The technical term is: "a knobbler;" in French, _un cerf à sa seconde tête.]

    The Bores

  • ‘May the foul fiend, booted and spurred, ride down his bawling throat, with a scythe at his girdle,” quoth Albert Drawslot; “here have I been telling him that all the marks were those of a buck of the first head, and he has hollowed the hounds upon a velvet-headed knobbler!

    Waverley

  • Video Sony Ericsson demos Walkman would-be N96 knobbler

    The Register

Comments

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  • From a British term related to disable, stun, kill. Thence a club or other instrument to effect such. See nobble, nobbler, nobbled. Also called a (fisherman's) cosh, an instrument with which to quickly dispatch a caught fish.

    "The fisherman seeing the wake of the speeding salmon must get ahead of it, dip the open (lave) net into the water to mesh it, lift it clear by grounding the handstaff and kill it with his knobbler, the fisherman's cosh. Quote from the British agricultural journal The Countryman, Vol. LIII, 1956, p. 90.

    September 1, 2010