Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of several small coins of low value formerly used in Austria and Germany.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

German, from Middle High German kriuzer, from kriuze, cross (from their having originally been stamped with a cross), from Old High German krūzi, from Latin crux, cruc-.

Examples

  • Thereupon he divided the loaf into four parts, and gave the apostle one of them, and a kreuzer likewise.

    Household Tales

  • Brother Lustig spoke as he had done before, and again gave him a quarter of the loaf and one kreuzer.

    Household Tales

  • Lustig gave him also the third quarter of bread and the third kreuzer.

    Household Tales

  • St. Peter thanked him, and Brother Lustig went onwards, and had but a quarter of the loaf, and one kreuzer.

    Household Tales

  • Then no one was more rejoiced than the peasant, and after the service was over, he went at once to the parson, who gave him the bag for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer.

    Household Tales

  • “For this I likewise bring thee a handsome bit of money,” said Thumbling, and gave his father the kreuzer which he earned on his travels.

    Household Tales

  • I met three beggars on the road, and I gave each of them a quarter of my bread, and one kreuzer.

    Household Tales

  • The last quarter I ate in the inn, and had a drink with the last kreuzer.

    Household Tales

  • They now divided the booty, but the little tailor only asked for a kreuzer because he could not carry more.

    Household Tales

  • St. Peter, who had assumed the appearance of a discharged soldier, met and spoke to him thus: “Good day, comrade, canst thou not give me a bit of bread, and a kreuzer to get a drink?”

    Household Tales

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