Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • This veck viddied this, be - cause my litso felt it was all drained of red red krovvy, very pale, and he would be able to viddy this.

    Where's the show?

  • Every day, my brothers, these films were like the same, all kicking and tolchocking and red red krovvy dripping off of litsos and plotts and spattering all over the camera lenses.

    Where's the show?

  • What I was being made to viddy now was not really a veshch I would have thought to be too bad before, it being only three or four malchicks crasting in a shop and filling their carmans with cutter, at the same time fillying about with the creeching starry ptitsa running the shop, tolchocking her and letting the red red krovvy flow.

    Where's the show?

  • Dim said, and the red krovvy was easing its flow now:

    Where's the show?

  • "There was never any trust," I said, bitter, wiping off the krovvy with my rooker.

    Where's the show?

  • There were like pictures of chellovecks being given the boot straight in the litso and all red red krovvy everywhere and I said I would like to be in on that.

    Where's the show?

  • Then I was dratsing my way back to being awake all through my own krovvy, pints and quarts and gallons of it, and then I found myself in my bed in this room.

    Where's the show?

  • And I myself took a clean tashtook from my carman to wrap round poor old dying Dim's rooker, howling and moaning as he was, and the krovvy stopped like I said it would, O my brothers.

    Where's the show?

  • He was still wiping at his goober, though no krovvy flowed any longer now.

    Where's the show?

  • I had just ticklewickled his fingers with my britva, and there he was looking at the malenky dribble of krovvy that was redding out in the lamplight.

    Where's the show?

Comments

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  • "Blood" (Russian origin)in Nadsat (literary lingo from A Clockwork orange).

    January 7, 2009