Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Having a fringe; fringed.
  • adj. Shaped or formed like a fringe, as a ligament.
  • adj. Slashed into narrow pointed lobes: a laciniate leaf.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of, pertaining to, or having a fringe.
  • adj. Cut into deep, narrow, irregular lobes; slashed.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Fringed; having a fringed border.
  • adj. Cut into deep, narrow, irregular lobes; slashed.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Adorned with fringes.
  • In botany, irregularly cut into narrow lobes; jagged: said of leaves, petals, bracts, etc.
  • In zoology, lacerate; slashed or jagged at the end or along the edge; incised as if frayed out; fringe-like.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. having edges irregularly and finely slashed

Etymologies

Latin lacinia, fringe, hem + -ate1.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
See lacinia. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The medial calcaneal (rami calcanei mediales; internal calcaneal) are several large arteries which arise from the posterior tibial just before its division; they pierce the laciniate ligament and are distributed to the fat and integument behind the tendo calcaneus and about the heel, and to the muscles on the tibial side of the sole, anastomosing with the peroneal and medial malleolar and, on the back of the heel, with the lateral calcaneal arteries.

    VI. The Arteries. 1F. The Posterior Tibial Artery

  • Behind the medial malleolus, the tendons, bloodvessels, and nerve are arranged, under cover of the laciniate ligament, in the following order from the medial to the lateral side: (1) the tendons of the Tibialis posterior and Flexor digitorum longus, lying in the same groove, behind the malleolus, the former being the more medial.

    VI. The Arteries. 1F. The Posterior Tibial Artery

  • They comprise three ligaments, viz., the transverse crural, the cruciate crural and the laciniate; and the superior and inferior peroneal retinacula.

    IV. Myology. 8d. The Fasciæ Around the Ankle

  • —The laciniate ligament is a strong fibrous band, extending from the tibial malleolus above to the margin of the calcaneus below, converting a series of bony grooves in this situation into canals for the passage of the tendons of the Flexor muscles and the posterior tibial vessels and tibial nerve into the sole of the foot.

    IV. Myology. 8d. The Fasciæ Around the Ankle

  • It receives an expansion from the tendon of the Biceps femoris laterally, and from the tendons of the Sartorius, Gracilis, Semitendinosus, and Semimembranosus medially; in front, it blends with the periosteum covering the subcutaneous surface of the tibia, and with that covering the head and malleolus of the fibula; below, it is continuous with the transverse crural and laciniate ligaments.

    IV. Myology. 8c. The Muscles and Fasciæ of the Leg

  • Above, where it covers the Popliteus, it is thick and dense, and receives an expansion from the tendon of the Semimembranosus; it is thinner in the middle of the leg; but below, where it covers the tendons passing behind the malleoli, it is thickened and continuous with the laciniate ligament.

    IV. Myology. 8c. The Muscles and Fasciæ of the Leg

  • —Accessory head to its lower and inner part usually ending in the tendocalcaneus, or the calcaneus, or the laciniate ligament.

    IV. Myology. 8c. The Muscles and Fasciæ of the Leg

  • —Flexor accessorius longus digitorum, not infrequent, origin from fibula, or tibia, or the deep fascia and ending in a tendon which, after passing beneath the laciniate ligament, joins the tendon of the long flexor or the Quadratus plantæ.

    IV. Myology. 8c. The Muscles and Fasciæ of the Leg

  • Occasionally, its tendon is lost in the laciniate ligament, or in the fascia of the leg.

    IV. Myology. 8c. The Muscles and Fasciæ of the Leg

  • In the lower fourth of the leg its tendon passes in front of that of the Flexor digitorum longus and lies with it in a groove behind the medial malleolus, but enclosed in a separate sheath; it next passes under the laciniate and over the deltoid ligament into the foot, and then beneath the plantar calcaneonavicular ligament.

    IV. Myology. 8c. The Muscles and Fasciæ of the Leg

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