lettuce & potato (retasu poteto aisu) love

lettuce & potato (retasu poteto aisu)

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Etymologies

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Comments

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  • I'm sure this information can be found in Shiipu!

    April 26, 2008

  • I wonder how Japanese people count sheep. Darn! Where did I leave my copy of 'A Wild sheep Chase'?

    April 26, 2008

  • *snuckering*

    April 26, 2008

  • *dying*

    April 25, 2008

  • Dear Pro:

    Nothing would give me greater pleasure than to say 'extinct member of Euarchontoglires', except that I've tried it unsuccessfully now three different times, and I think I may have sprained my tongue. So I hope you don't mind if I just call you Pro.

    How do you feel about Pika-chu?

    April 25, 2008

  • "retasu" (Let us) say extinct member of Euarchontoglires.

    April 25, 2008

  • Even better. I thought I heard rodentary noises emanating from his direction. I may have erred.

    April 25, 2008

  • Shouldn't that be extinct lagomorphs, B? Suddenly, the interest in retasu is beginning to make more sense.

    April 25, 2008

  • I agree with the comments, your English is spellbindingly competent. And you're one of my favourite extinct rodents.

    April 25, 2008

  • And by the way, thank you all. I'm saving this page for times of low self-esteem.

    April 25, 2008

  • I think you need aisubaagu retasu.

    April 25, 2008

  • Do you need iceberg lettuce to make good retasu poteto aisu?

    April 25, 2008

  • Oh. Well, master of the obvious, that's me.

    April 24, 2008

  • I think that's taken as a given, c_b.

    April 24, 2008

  • Does no one else find the oddity here to be "why mix these two vegetables in the first place, let alone in an ice cream?"?

    Though I'm enjoying the rest of the discussion as well...

    April 24, 2008

  • Yes, Pro. I've been marvelling at your extraordinary command of English ever since you started posting. Your English is truly excellent.

    But you already know this. :-)

    April 24, 2008

  • I second that, ptero. Was about to say the same thing.

    April 24, 2008

  • Pro, you probably know this already, but your English is superb. It's better than the English of most of my friends, all of whom are native speakers. So, no sighing necessary. :)

    April 24, 2008

  • Oh, I see your point. Well...

    Japanese has three alphabets (well, Kanji only kinda an alphabet but that's beside the point). Hiragana is for words that were originially Japanese, kanji is for words borrowed from Chinese symbols and katakana is for words borrowed from other languages. For example, the words lettuce and potato. And the Japanese word for bread is "pan" from the French, and the word for a part time job is "beito" which comes from arbeit the German word for work.

    So, what I'm trying to say in my round about way is yes, they are just Japanesizations. But no, it's not unusual and it's nothing to do with the Japanese diet. :)

    Did anything I just say make any sense, or help at all?

    April 24, 2008

  • I wondered that too, Pro.

    April 24, 2008

  • OK, I'll try again: retasu and poteto seem to be, instead of the Japanese words for lettuce and potato, just a Japanesization of the English words, backtransliterated by our friend kat.

    (Sigh, is my English so bad?)

    April 24, 2008

  • Wouldn't it be rettasu (レッタス)?

    I'm not really sure what you're asking, Pro.

    April 24, 2008

  • Correct me if I'm wrong, but retasu and poteto are just transliterations of lettuce and potato in Japanese, right? Isn't it weird? Maybe it has something to do with the fact that Japanese don't consider "western" greens as part of their diet (again, correct me if I'm wrong).

    April 24, 2008