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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Then there were lewdies being dragged off creeching though not on the sound-track, my brothers, the only sound being music, and being tolchocked while they were dragged off.

    Where's the show?

  • It was dark and there was a wind sharp as a nozh getting up, and there were very very few lewdies about.

    Where's the show?

  • But what the Government was really most boastful about was the way in which they reckoned the streets had been made safer for all peace-loving night-walking lewdies in the last six months, what with better pay for the police and the police getting like tougher with young hooli - gans and perverts and burglars and all that cal.

    Where's the show?

  • It seemed written in a very bezoomny like style, full of Ah and Oh and all that cal, but what seemed to come out of it was that all lewdies nowadays were being turned into machines and that they were really - you and me and him and kiss-my - sharries - more like a natural growth like a fruit.

    Where's the show?

  • It is not right, not always, for lewdies in the town to viddy too much of our summary punishments.

    Where's the show?

  • And where there had been just the noise of coughing kashl kashl kashl and like shadows of the lewdies was now a real audience, and in this audience there were litsos I knew.

    Where's the show?

  • I could viddy no lewdies in sight, nor no lights of houses.

    Where's the show?

  • You got some of the real horrorshow ancient domies here, my brothers, with starry lewdies living in them, thin old barking like colonels with sticks and old ptitsas who were widows and deaf starry damas with cats who, my brothers, had felt not the touch of any chelloveck in the whole of their pure like jeeznies.

    Where's the show?

  • And all the time lewdies passed by and viddied all this but minded their own, it being perhaps a common street-sight.

    Where's the show?

  • He had books under his arm and a crappy umbrella and was coming round the corner from the Public Biblio, which not many lewdies used these days.

    Where's the show?

Comments

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  • "People" (Russian origin)in Nadsat (literary lingo from A Clockwork orange).

    January 7, 2009