Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun See libelous, libelously.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Alternative spelling of libelous.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective (used of statements) harmful and often untrue; tending to discredit or malign

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I have posted a comment on that page asking Mr Sherr to set out why exactly the statements he describes would be libellous, that is why such statements would make people think worse of him the legal test for libel.

    On Introducing Mr Jeremy Sherr

  • I have posted a comment on that page asking Mr Sherr to set out why exactly the statements he describes would be libellous, that is why such statements would make people think worse of him the legal test for libel.

    Archive 2009-01-01

  • I once received a three page letter that my lawyer defined as libellous, from an academic colleague, saying I had no right to say what I was saying, especially in public lectures.

    Think Progress » Limbaugh: Stranded Polar Bears Are ‘Just Playing Around…Like Your Cat Goes To Its Litter Box’

  • I once received a three page letter that my lawyer defined as libellous, from an academic colleague, saying I had no right to say what I was saying, especially in public lectures.

    Global Warming: The Cold, Hard Facts?

  • His accusers declared that “this book may justly be called libellous, scandalous and seditious.”

    The Dragon’s Trail

  • His accusers declared that “this book may justly be called libellous, scandalous and seditious.”

    The Dragon’s Trail

  • His accusers declared that “this book may justly be called libellous, scandalous and seditious.”

    The Dragon’s Trail

  • His accusers declared that “this book may justly be called libellous, scandalous and seditious.”

    The Dragon’s Trail

  • I once received a three page letter that my lawyer defined as libellous, from an academic colleague, saying I had no right to say what I was saying, especially in public lectures.

    Canada Free Press

  • I once received a three page letter that my lawyer defined as libellous, from an academic colleague, saying I had no right to say what I was saying, especially in public lectures.

    Canada Free Press

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