Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The property that makes a person likeable, that allows them to be liked.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • As President Obama pushes forward with his agenda, he may find that a homecoming king's likeability is just as integral as the power and authority inherent to the Oval Office.

    McCain: Obama has not changed Washington

  • As President Obama pushes forward with his agenda, he may find that a homecoming king's likeability is just as integral as the power and authority inherent to the Oval Office.

    'Cash for clunkers' good through weekend, maybe beyond

  • (CNN) - As President Obama pushes forward with his agenda, he may find that a homecoming king's likeability is just as integral as the power and authority inherent to the Oval Office.

    Obama's weapon: A dose of homecoming king charm

  • President Obama's likeability is key to his leadership, experts say.

    Obama's weapon: A dose of homecoming king charm

  • As President Obama pushes forward with his agenda, he may find that a homecoming king's likeability is just as integral as the power and authority inherent to the Oval Office.

    POLITICAL HOT TOPICS: July 31, 2009

  • Nike was 4th in likeability, signaling a shakeup in the hegemony US firms have enjoyed.

    Not exactly a Valentine's Day song

  • Yet Rogen’s innate likeability translates into vulnerability in his scenes with Weston and Wilson, and the tenderness of these scenes help make the pat, “all is forgiven” Hollywood ending bearable.

    DVD Review: Observe And Report « Screaming Blue Reviews

  • There's also what I would call the likeability factor in Dean Acheson, former great Secretary of State once had a meeting in the White House with Lyndon Johnson and Johnson was moaning that his poll numbers were so low due to Vietnam and he said to Acheson, why are polls dropping on me?

    CNN Transcript Oct 17, 2008

  • I am not suggesting, of course, that traditional workshop questions are entirely without merit (though I personally will have no truck with the idea of likeability, which is the hobgoblin of small minds), nor am I suggesting that even quite innovative stories are without conflict or character (although one does recall John Hawkes's famous remark that "the true enemies of the novel were plot, character, setting and theme").

    Writers and Mentors

  • I am not suggesting, of course, that traditional workshop questions are entirely without merit (though I personally will have no truck with the idea of likeability, which is the hobgoblin of small minds), nor am I suggesting that even quite innovative stories are without conflict or character (although one does recall John Hawkes's famous remark that "the true enemies of the novel were plot, character, setting and theme").

    Writers and Mentors

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