Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In farriery, a dry scab or scurfy eruption on the hock of a horse or at the bend of the knee; “sore places on the inside of the fore legs of a horse”

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun plural (Far.) A scurfy eruption in the bend of the knee of the fore leg of a horse. See sallenders.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A scurfy eruption in the bend of the knee of the foreleg of a horse.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

French malandres, from Latin malandria ("blisters or pustules on the neck, especially in horses").

Examples

  • And indeed the time was very dangerous in coming from the fair, in so far that many trained bowmen were cast at the muster and quite rejected, although the chimney-tops were high enough, according to the proportion of the windgalls in the legs of horses, or of the malanders, which in the esteem of expert farriers is no better disease, or else the story of Ronypatifam or

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • And indeed the time was very dangerous in coming from the fair, in so far that many trained bowmen were cast at the muster and quite rejected, although the chimney-tops were high enough, according to the proportion of the windgalls in the legs of horses, or of the malanders, which in the esteem of expert farriers is no better disease, or else the story of Ronypatifam or

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • A similar condition occurs behind the knee and in front of the hock (malanders and salanders), and may extend from these points to the hoof, virtually incasing that side of the limb in a permanent incrusting sheath.

    Special Report on Diseases of the Horse

  • And indeed the time was very dangerous in coming from the fair, in so far that many trained bowmen were cast at the muster and quite rejected, although the chimney-tops were high enough, according to the proportion of the windgalls in the legs of horses, or of the malanders, which in the esteem of expert farriers is no better disease, or else the story of Ronypatifam or Lamibaudichon, interpreted by some to be the tale of

    Gargantua and Pantagruel, Illustrated, Book 2

Comments

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  • One has to wonder if salamanders ever suffer from malanders.

    November 28, 2010