Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as maple, 1.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Win McNamee/Getty Images Lockheed Martin engineer David Sharp showing off the 'Samarai Flyer,' whose design was inspired by the winged maple-tree seeds that flutter to the ground each autumn.

    Drone Time

  • Notwithstanding the bad weather, the settlers renewed their stores of different things, stone-pine almonds, rhizomes, syrup from the maple-tree, for the vegetable part; rabbits from the warren, agouties, and kangaroos for the animal part.

    The Mysterious Island

  • Notwithstanding the bad weather, the settlers renewed their stores of different things, stone-pine almonds, rhizomes, syrup from the maple-tree, for the vegetable part; rabbits from the warren, agouties, and kangaroos for the animal part.

    The Mysterious Island

  • I did not stop for a word with my step-mother, but, passing rapidly through the house, threw my parcels on the bed in the sitting-room, and, running down the walk to the maple-tree under which my dug-out was always tied, jumped into it and sculled out into the river.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 76, February, 1864

  • The poor creature crept out of the house, -- I saw her go, -- and kneeling down behind that great maple-tree, she lifted up her arms to heaven, and I heard, or thought I heard her, moaning.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, No. 62, December, 1862

  • Behind the maple-tree, the wood began again; without a syllable, she stepped aside, suffered him to pass, and hastened to bury herself in its recesses.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 06, No. 37, November, 1860

  • Then Cyrus and the boys caught sight of it spinning over and over like a ball, towards a maple-tree with widely projecting limbs and thick foliage; for it knew well that in speed it was no match for the dog, and therefore resorted to a neat little stratagem.

    Camp and Trail A Story of the Maine Woods

  • Bab and Betty, for they stood under the maple-tree, and the memory of their circulating library made him forget his dignity in his gratitude.

    St. Nicholas, Vol. 5, No. 4, February 1878

  • A chattering squirrel, seated on the low bough of a maple-tree, with his fore paws against his white breast, his eyes like twinkling beads, and his restless little head playing bo-peep with the intruding boy, began to scold the latter for venturing into his forest playground.

    Camp and Trail A Story of the Maine Woods

  • Then it noiselessly dropped from the tip of the branch to the ground, alighting, like a skilled acrobat, on its shoulders, doubled its pointed black nose under its stomach, and again rolled over and over for a considerable distance, when it got on its short legs and scurried away, while Tiger still bayed at the foot of the maple-tree, thinking the vanished prey was above.

    Camp and Trail A Story of the Maine Woods

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