Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Physics A quantity that expresses the degree to which a substance possesses a property, such as elasticity.
  • noun The square root of the product of a complex number and its complex conjugate.
  • noun A natural number used as a specified divisor in modular arithmetic.
  • noun The number by which a logarithm in one system must be multiplied to obtain the corresponding logarithm in another system.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In mathematics, a real positive number that serves as measure or parameter of a function or effect. Represented by M. or μ.
  • noun In physics, the measure of an effect under conditions whose measure is unity. Thus, a physical modulus is not a number, but a physical quantity.
  • noun [capitalized] In conchology, a genus of gastropods, referred to the Littorinidæ or periwinkles, or made type of the family Modulidæ. The shell is depressed and trochiform, with a deeply cut columellar tooth and many-whorled operculum.
  • noun then the modulus of transformation is

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Math., Mech., & Physics) A quantity or coefficient, or constant, which expresses the measure of some specified force, property, or quality, as of elasticity, strength, efficiency, etc.; a parameter.
  • noun a formula expressing the work which a given machine can perform under the conditions involved in its construction; the relation between the work done upon a machine by the moving power, and that yielded at the working points, either constantly, if its motion be uniform, or in the interval of time which it occupies in passing from any given velocity to the same velocity again, if its motion be variable; -- called also the efficiency of the machine.
  • noun (Math.) a number by which all the Napierian logarithms must be multiplied to obtain the logarithms in another system.
  • noun An expression of the force (usually in terms of the height in feet or weight in pounds of a column of the same body) which would be necessary to elongate a prismatic body of a transverse section equal to a given unit, as a square inch or foot, to double, or to compress it to half, its original length, were that degree of elongation or compression possible, or within the limits of elasticity; -- called also Young's modulus.
  • noun the measure of the force necessary to break a given substance across, as a beam, expressed by eighteen times the load which is required to break a bar of one inch square, supported flatwise at two points one foot apart, and loaded in the middle between the points of support.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun mathematics The base with respect to which a congruence is computed.
  • noun mathematics The absolute value of a complex number.
  • noun physics A coefficient that expresses how much of a certain property is possessed by a certain substance.
  • noun computing, programming An operator placed between two numbers, to get the remainder of the division of those numbers.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the absolute value of a complex number
  • noun (physics) a coefficient that expresses how much of a specified property is possessed by a specified substance
  • noun an integer that can be divided without remainder into the difference between two other integers

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin, diminutive of modus, measure; see med- in Indo-European roots.]

Examples

  • For example, the semantic constraint of the function "modulus" is an integer.

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  • In the lower part, the Young’s modulus is half that of the upper part.

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  • The transverse strength is also called modulus of rupture.

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  • However, by conducting AFM nanoindentation experiments, the researchers found that the mummified skin had a slightly higher Young's modulus, meaning that it was slightly less elastic and stiffer than recent skin.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • However, by conducting AFM nanoindentation experiments, the researchers found that the mummified skin had a slightly higher Young's modulus, meaning that it was slightly less elastic and stiffer than recent skin.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • However, by conducting AFM nanoindentation experiments, the researchers found that the mummified skin had a slightly higher Young's modulus, meaning that it was slightly less elastic and stiffer than recent skin.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • However, by conducting AFM nanoindentation experiments, the researchers found that the mummified skin had a slightly higher Young's modulus, meaning that it was slightly less elastic and stiffer than recent skin.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • Stevens proposed that subjects could quantitatively estimate the magnitude of a physical stimulus Stevens 'magnitude estimation procedure: Provide "modulus" (baseline) stimulus (e.g., loud tone, electric shock) and call it 100 Have subject estimate intensity of subsequent stimuli on scale 0 ... 100 e.g. if tone sounds half as loud rate it 50 More ef fi cient than Weber's procedure!

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  • * On the integers more generally, [[modular arithmetic]] operates on the equivalence classes defined by remainder on division my a fixed '' modulus '' '' M ''.

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  • Cars are complex objects that represent the outcomes of literally millions of discrete compromises governing everything from, say, the elastic modulus of an engine mount to the degree of sassiness in the rake of a windshield.

    The Best Sports Car, and Why to Skip It

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